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C.P.R.& CHILD BIRTHING VIDEo
LEARN C.P.R.   <<<---- CLICK LINK ON LEFT

'Learn CPR' is a free public service 
supported by the University of 
Washington School of Medicine.  
Learn the basics of CPR - 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 
The American Heart Association 
issued updated CPR guidelines in 



LOTS OF VIDEOS TO HELP ! !




Learn CPR CPR IN THREE SIMPLE STEPS
(Please try to attend a CPR training course)

 CLICK HERE FOR A VIDEO DEMONSTRATION

1. CALL

Check the victim for unresponsiveness. If the person is not responsive and not breathing or not breathing normally. Call 911 and return to the victim. In most locations, the emergency dispatcher can assist you with CPR instructions.

2. PUMP

If the victim is still not breathing normally, coughing or moving, begin chest compressions.  Push down in the center of the chest 2 inches 30 times. Pump hard and fast at the rate of at least 100/minute, faster than once per second.

 


3. BLOW

Tilt the head back and lift the chin. Pinch nose and cover the mouth with yours and blow until you see the chest rise. Give 2 breaths.  Each breath should take 1 second.

CONTINUE WITH 30 PUMPS AND 2 BREATHS UNTIL HELP ARRIVES
NOTE: This ratio is the same for one-person & two-person CPR.  In two-person CPR the person pumping the chest stops while the other gives mouth-to-mouth breathing.

What complications can occur?

What about checking for a pulse?

DO YOU WANT TO TAKE THESE INSTRUCTIONS WITH YOU?
CLICK HERE FOR A PRINTABLE CPR POCKET GUIDE



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How to Perform CPR on a Child


10 Steps to CPR

by  
10 Steps to CPR
CPR is best performed by those who have been properly trained. Photo Creditandy_Q/iStock/Getty Images

Overview

Performing CPR properly can mean the difference between life and death. CPR, which stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is an emergency procedure done when someone’s breathing or heartbeat has stopped. CPR techniques vary depending on the age or size of the patient. Those who are certified or trained in CPR are ideally the ones who should perform the procedure, notes MedlinePlus. People should not rely on reading information online or in books as adequate training to administer CPR.

Step 1

Survey the area. Although it is best to begin CPR as quickly as possible, the person who is about to perform CPR needs to ensure that he will be safe while performing the procedure. This may include looking for traffic, fires or other potential dangers.

Step 2

Determine if CPR is necessary. Ask loudly if the person who looks to be in trouble is OK or gently shake the person to check responsiveness. Listen, look and feel for breathing. CPR is necessary only when a person is not breathing or circulating blood adequately, explains KidsH

Complications of CPR

Step 3

Call 911. If two people are present, one can begin CPR immediately while the other 

calls 911 for help. If only one person is present, however, that person should call

 911 before beginning CPR if he has immediate access to a telephone or administer 

CPR for approximately 1 to 2 minutes and then call 911.

Step 4

Position the unresponsive person appropriately. Place the person on her back on 

a firm surface, such as the ground. Open her airway by lifting her chin and tilting 

her head upward.

Step 5

Begin rescue breathing. Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation in adults requires pinching 

the nostrils and giving two breaths into the mouth, while mouth-to-nose rescue 

breathing in adults requires breaths delivered through the nostrils. Mouth-to-nose 

rescue breathing is useful when the mouth is injured or cannot be opened. If the

 victim is an infant, rescue breathing can also be administered through the mouth

 and nostrils simultaneously if the CPR performer’s mouth is large enough to cover 

both. Give one rescue breath and watch to see if the victim’s chest rises. If it does, 

give a second rescue breath. If the victim's chest doesn’t rise, reposition the head 

or check to see if something is blocking the air passage and try again. Only trained 

professionals should attempt rescue breathing. Those uncomfortable with their 

skills in this area may consider performing only chest compressions until emergency 

help arrives, suggests the Mayo Clinic.

Step 6

Begin chest compressions. This should be done only when the person is 

unconscious and does not have normal breathing, coughing or movement, 

explains MedlinePlus. For adult patients, the person performing the CPR 

should place the heel of her dominant hand between and slightly below the 

victim's nipples, and place the other hand on top of that hand. Position shoulders 

directly above the hands and keep arms straight. Use body weight to push the 

chest down about 2 inches, and continue pushing at a rate of 100 compressions 

a minute. For child patients, use a similar process but use one hand to compress 

the chest about 1/3 to 1/2 of the depth of the chest. For infants, two fingers should 

be used in lieu of hands and the infant’s chest should be pushed approximately 

1/3 to 1/2 the depth of the chest, according to the University of Maryland Medical 

Center. 

Step 7

Return to rescue breathing after approximately 30 compressions. Give two more

 rescue breaths, then return to perform 30 additional chest compressions. 


Repeat as needed.

Step 8

Administer a shock to adult or child patients using an automatic external 

defibrillator if possible. Those not trained to use a defibrillator may receive 

instructions and guidance from a 911 operator. After administering one shock, 

resume chest compressions for 2 minutes before administering a second shock.

Automatic external defibrillators should not be used on children younger than 

1, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Step 9



Continue the CPR process until emergency medical personnel arrives or until

 the victim regains consciousness or movement.

Step 10

Provide information to the appropriate health care professionals. Explain how the 

victim was found and how long the CPR was performed, as well as any other 

information that may be relevant to treatment.