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CHAPTER I.   
 
HOMEOPATHIC  THESIS
DR DAVID CLEVELAND 508-487-1956  or  508-487-1981
CLEVELAND78@LIVE.COM
 

A Thesis Presented by     

                                   DAVID CLEVELAND

Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies,

University of Massachusetts Boston, in partial

fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

MASTER OF ARTS    September 1998

Critical and Creative Thinking Program

© 1997 David Cleveland

ISBN 0-938534-10-6

Library of Congress

93-093724

HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINE:

CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING

Approved as to style and content by:

John R. Murray, Assistant Professor

Chairperson of Committee

Henry Mariani, Assistant Professor

James Doyle, D.O. Member

Delores Gallo, Director

Critical and Creative Thinking Program

ABSTRACT

HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINE:

CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING

September 1997

Directed by Professor John R. Murray

This thesis explores the interrelationship between the philosophy and practice of homeopathy and the skills strategies and techniques of critical and creative thinking.

The thesis describes the critical and creative thinking skills that are specifically found in the practice and philosophy of homeopathy. The thesis also gives the reader an understanding of the philosophy and practice of homeopathy. The author takes the reader through one type of homeopathic evaluation process and simultaneously identifies the c.c.t. skills and processes associated with the evaluation. The thesis gives the reader an abbreviated comparison between the medical philosophy of the practice of traditional medical doctors and homeopathic doctors. Furthermore, notes are made of the changes that are taking place in society, toward the acceptance of homeopathy and other alternative forms of treatment of illness.

Acknowledgments

It was Möntaigne who suggested that he "had gathered, a bouquet of other peoples' flowers and only the thread that holds them together was his own." (Oxford 1989, 355, 6)

Other peoples' flowers abound in voice throughout this document. Thanks and great respect go to my gardeners, for helping me be wise in my writing. They weeded out that which was not growing well, and made sure that I was not over fertilizing. Deep thanks for their caring, and sharing of knowledge.


Dr. Henry Mariani     Dr. Patricia Davidson   Dr. John Murray                   Dr. James Doyle       Dr. Delores Gallo      Dr. Archie Keigan                      Dr. Inez Westerhoek

Thanks to poet W.H. Auden for defining the personal nature of the thesis.

Some thirty inches from my nose

The frontier of my person goes,

And all the untitled air between

Is private pagus and demesne.      

Stranger, unless with bedroom eyes

I beckon you to fraternalize,

Beware of rudely crossing it:

I have no gun but I can spit.


My ‘thank-you' bouquet, goes to the gardeners who planted the original seeds, (sic) my Mother and Father.

T A B L E   O F   C O N T E N T S  

INTRODUCTION  

CHAPTER I.    

CHAPTER II.  

CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING

Critical Thinking  

Uncritical Thinking

Critical Thinkers  

A Prerequisite to Critical Thinking  

Critical Thinking Vocabulary  

Richard Paul: Critical Thinkers Needed

Pathways of Creative Thinking.

Einstein's Theory of Guessing

Einstein and creativity.

Humor and Creativity

No Unified Psychological Theory

Creativity is Like the Scientific Method

Stand Under Their Own Stars

Personal Reflections on C.C.T

Critical and Creative Thinking is Caught not Taught.

CHAPTER I I I. HAHNEMANN THE FATHER OF HOMEOPATHY

Overview  

Hahnemann Arrives

Early Support in Sam Hahnemann's Life

Dad's Support

Rousseau's Influence

Schoolmaster's Support.

Dr. Von Quaring

The Governor.

Hahnemann Works on Translating

Paradigm du Jour.

The Doctrine of Phlogiston

Lavoisier's Exact Measurements

Lavoisier loses his head to Robespiere

Hahnemann's Study of Chemistry

Hahnemann's chemical tests

The Cautery

The Seton

Bleeding and Blistering

Hahnemann Steps Away From Orthodox Medicine

Dissatisfaction With Orthodox Medicine.

He Discovers The Theory

Prominent Homeopathic Supporters

Current Day Testimonials

Dizzy Gillespie

Tina Turner

Yehudi Menuhin

William Tyler

Charles Menninger M.D.

President of A.M.A.

Sir William Osler Supports Homeopathy

Atomic Body

CHAPTER I V    HOMEOPATHY & CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING

Tools of the Homeopath

The Repertory Resource Books.

The Materia Medica Resource Books.

Homeopathy's Rules of Cure

Rule One, Rule Two, Rule Three, Rule Four.

Abstract Rules and Theories

Vital Force and Homeopathy

Homeopathy and Ultimate Indeterminacy

Initial Observations.

Multiple observation perspectives

Listening to the patient

Up front evidence

Carrying the weight of the world

The starting place can be anywhere

Guiding the questions, not asking

Two Different Approaches

Classical Homeopathy.

Drainage Homeopathy.

Homeopathic Dilutions and Small Numbers

Medical Paradigm and Tiny Numbers

Was it Googol or goo-goo?

One million. How big is that?

Accepted numbers, in daily use

Comparing Orthodox Medicine

All Drugs Have Symptoms

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes

Drug Manufacturers

Dangerous drugs and excessive profits

Drugs are a delusion

Personal Change

Homeopathic Case Histories

Carol and her respiratory problems.

Two year old's seizures.

Keinbach's disease & a university professor.

Fourteen year old's progressive blindness

The folk singer's tumor

Gangrenous leg of 23 year old

Crohn's disease and Mandy

Vanessa suffered from a neurological condition

Ongoing Research in Homeopathy 1997

In Conclusion

Bibliography       

CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING                                                    

The thesis is organized into four chapters. In the spirit of critical and creative thinking, information is organized to allow the reader to be the judge of the expert's testimonies. Readers ultimately will be the ones making deliberations, or judgments, as new insights into orthodox and homeopathic medicine, critical and creative thinking, and paradigm change, are generated. Chapter I. is the introduction to the thesis. Chapter II. discusses critical and creative thinking. It begins with a brief discussion of critical thinking, then concentrates on creative thinking. Popular interpretations of critical and creative thinking are presented using, past and present, experts' voices. These experts, include Newton, Faraday, Maxwell, Paracelcus, Jenner and of course Einstein. In addition, to these past experts, are the current voices of experts mentioned in Table 2.1. All of these people adopted critical and creative thinking to go beyond the existing paradigms of their days. The chapter continues with a story of critical and creative thinking at work, while commentaries are included to illustrate the widest range of thinking on the subject. The authors' personal reflections on critical and creative thinking bring the chapter to a close.

Chapter III, introduces homeopathic medicine, and commences with an overview of ancient medical history , and theories that demonstrated early health care foundations. Dr. Samuel Hahnemanns' insights into the laws of healing, are shown as the catalysts for his creation of homeopathic medicine. Included in the chapter is the history of Hahnemanns' childhood, family life, education, and personal struggles with the medical practices of the time. His dissatisfaction with these medical practices is described as leading to his recognition of homeopathy as a new medical paradigm. Hahnemanns’ pioneering work in the fledgling field of chemistry is mentioned, as the author believes it also contributed to a medical paradigm in the late 1700s.

Chapter IV ., Evaluation Framework for homeopathy, examines a homeopathic strategy for completing a patient evaluation. Exploring 23 years of personal experience, demonstration consists of what is required to accomplish a homeopathic patient evaluation, and how it utilizes critical and creative thinking. This chapter includes definitions of the homeopathic reference books that are most commonly used, and how the authors' personal techniques vary from traditional homeopathy.

The infinitesimals portion of this chapter discusses the most misunderstood realm of homeopathic medicine. "Infinitesimals" describes the minute dilutions conducted on the ingredients that compose the homeopathic remedies. The effectiveness of these dilutions is discussed, along with many cited examples. The opposite of Infintismals are the complex drugs that orthodox medicine dispenses. These drugs are briefly discussed to give an accurate viewpoint of what orthodox drugs are, and how homeopathic medicine compares with them. The following question is also addressed, "Why should I consider homeopathy when there are so many, apparently successful, orthodox drugs available?"

Next, is a listing of some noteworthy homeopathic followers and their statements regarding homeopathy. This chapter includes the author's personal homeopathic research and accomplishments over the past twenty years as a homeopathic practitioner. Current research in the field of homeopathy closes the chapter.

Paradigm and paradigm change is defined in a 1974 dictionary , as a "model or a pattern", or "a systematic inflection of a verb or noun showing a complete conjugation or declension." (Woolf, H.B. 1974) The 1987 dictionary, American Encyclopedic Dictionary , defines paradigm as, ". ..an example or pattern, especially of inflection of a noun, verb. . .” Paradigm and paradigm change affect many beliefs, both ancient and modern.

Definitions from people considered experts in their fields, and challengers of paradigm, are included for illumination and comparison. Paradigm and paradigm. change are included in this thesis, along with critical and creative thinking, as multifaceted threads that will expose and integrate consideration of homeopathic medicine. The paradigm of economics is contrasted in Appendix B.

 CHAPTER I I.                             

Critical and creative thinking (c.c.t.) is included in this thesis as a tool, used by homeopathic practitioners.

Critical Thinking

'Critical,' as used in critical thinking, refers to a neutral, expansionist way of thinking. It uses multiple perspectives, identifications of assumptions, logic, and "what if" questions. It infers thinking that is beyond the obvious. Albert Shanker, quoted in Omni magazine said the following about critical thinking. "Life requires critical thinking skills, the ability to express yourself, persuade, argue and build, that's what we need to teach students" (Cummings 1990, 44).

Uncritical Thinking

It may be useful to review Richard Paul's definition of a non-critical thinker, before continuing. "A non-critical thinker is a person who hasn't developed intellectual abilities. This allows uncritical people to be naive, conforming, manipulable, dogmatic in their thinking, and easily confused. In addition, they can be close minded, narrow minded, poor with word choices, and unable to identify evidence from an interpretation. The uncritical person may feel that they are being critical in their thinking which makes our topic a fundamental human problem. Teaching for insight can approach the problem by illuminating the general tendency to be an uncritical thinker" (Paul 1993).

Critical Thinkers

Paul feels that critical thinkers will conceptualize the whole and will be involved in overcoming psychological and intellectual barriers that they may be accepting, and comfortable with at present. He subsequently, states that critical thinking is incorporated into a lifestyle, not just studied for a semester or two. One of the most important traits that critical and creative thinkers possess, according to Paul, is that of suspending judgement and being open-minded. (Paul 1993)

A Prerequisite to Critical Thinking.

"Critical thinking starts from perceiving your place in society . . . but critical thinking goes beyond your perceptions, toward the actions and decisions people make to shape and gain control over their life" (Costa 1991, 188).

Critical Thinking Vocabulary

Costa's definition of critical thinking states that we must use ample evidence, statistical information, facts, examples and expert witnesses from primary and secondary sources. Primary evidence, as provided by personal observation, has the greatest impact. Secondary evidence, leads a person to ask questions, and some of these questions could be as follows.

Is the source considered an expert on the subject? •Is the source in the references cited, or a bibliography of other works? •Is primary material (first hand) used as evidence? •Is the source's use of language objective? •Is the source recently dated? •Is the source found in a reliable publication? (Costa 1991, 305)

The reader can see from the above critical thinking questions that "critical" is not about the words in the following list:

Derogatory, Disparaging, Faultfinding, Picky, Judgmental, Belittle, Contempt, Negative, Uncomplimentary, Deprecate, Ridicule, Contrary, Disapproving, Dissenting, Opposing, Fatalistic, Pessimistic, Skeptical, Dubious. (Davis 1986, 54)

A critical thinker would most likely be using "critical" in the sense of:

Crucial, Decisive, Important, Momentous, Pivotal, Analytical, Discriminating, Preference, Selective, Significant, Meaningful. (Davis 1986, 44)

A critical and creative thinker would probably accept that there are as many thinkers, and viewpoints, as there are people on the planet.

Costa helps to identify critical and creative thinkers by explaining:

Just as basic reading differs from advanced reading, basic thinking abilities also differ from critical thinking abilities. (Costa 1991, 3)

Richard Paul: Critical Thinkers Needed.

Richard Paul explains how important the need for critical thinkers is and the difficulties surrounding this task.

The necessary paradigm shifts, however, do entail the cultivation of critical thinking across the work force, up and down the lines of labor and management, across industries, across educational levels, and into the everyday discussions of national and international issues. This shift is painfully against the American grain, contrary to our orthodox folk wisdom, and incompatible with much current thinking of both business and labor leaders (Paul 1993, 11).

Pathways Of Creative Thinking

This section, on creative thinking, begins with a short story from an (unknown) architect. He had finished building a cluster of office buildings in the middle of a large area that he had sown with grass. He then waited to put the sidewalks into place until people had etched into the lawn, the natural pathways. When the pathways were well- defined, he constructed the appropriate sidewalks for the buildings (Oech 1983, 144).

The following statements are further ‘pathways' of creative definitions, taken from a large sampling of authors. These creative thinking definitions generally include the ‘individual', which in turn includes the scientist, the homeopath, and orthodox medical people, as they work in their individual disciplines. Table (2.1) presents some views of ‘creativity' by people in the fields of education, science, psychology, and critical and creative thinking.

Many of skills and strategies of c.c.t. describe a similar pattern of evaluation that a homeopath uses in determining a client's imbalance. For example, a homeopath must remain open to comments and symptoms and continually search for alternative explanations. No two clients are considered the same, nor is it expected that they will describe their concerns in similar ways. The homeopath must be able to hear a symptom and frequently rephrase it in order to elicit deeper, causal symptoms. Failure occurs in homeopathy, but there always remains an opportunity to turn that failure into further research of the patient's symptoms. As a homeopath, the author particularly cherishes the use of humor during the evaluation work-up. The author's thoughts are that if the person can understand their problems with appropriate humor (without judgement, or criticism), that they may shed some light onto their condition, allowing them to be more objective as to their condition. Often times humor will allow symptoms that have been suppressed to resurface. In addition, humor and laughter challenges the healing abilities of the body into action.

Table 2.1 Viewpoints On Creative Thinkers & Thinking.

                    Author                               Interpretation                                        Source

Jerome Bruner: An act that produces effective surprise--this I shall take as the hallmark of a creative enterprise BrunerBruner 1962, 3C. Cornett. . . Thrive on incongruity. . .have a whimsical frame of mind. Costa 1991, 103Joseph Costa. . .Exposing students to the flavor and texture of creative inquiry and hope they get hooked.Costa 1991, 87 Gary Davis: The creative person and self-actualized person are the same.Davis 1986, 29 Sigmond Freud Creativity is merely the outcome of an unconscious neurotic conflict.Davis 1991, 22    Carl Jung: The ‘psychological type' is consciously involved in creativity. The ‘visionary type' is creative and mystical.Davis 1986, 15   Roger von Oech "Humor forces you to combine ideas that are usually not associated with each other." Oech 1983, 92  Sidney Parnes "Humor and creativity depend on seeing something in the more obvious way." Parnes 1981, 35       Richard Paul "Creativity is essential to all rational dialogical thinking. . ." Baron 1987, 143  David Perkins . . . "They learn to view failure as normal, even interesting and challenging."  Costa 1991, 194  David Renzulli "Gifted children are high in creativity, and motivation, and are at least average in intelligence." Davis 1991, 158 (Burrhus Frederic) aka  B.F.Skinner: "Since we have no freedom and our behavior is controlled by others we should not accept the dignity of personal achievement." Davis 1991, 25 

Einstein's Theory of Guessing.

A recent scientist who creatively guessed, when nothing he was doing was providing solutions to a problem, was Albert Einstein. In his theory of gravitation he went ahead and guessed, beyond the already known principles. (Feynman 1991, 162)

Einstein and creativity. "A creative person is always questioning and examining where he or she is in the universe." According to Feynman, Einstein had the following to say about creativity.

"To raise new questions, new problems, to regard old problems from a new angle requires creative imagination and makes real advances. The formation of a problem is often more essential than its solution, which may be merely a matter of mathematical or experimental skills". (Einstein in Feynman 1991, 170)

Humor and Creativity.

Cornett (1986) felt that, "Creative problem solvers thrive on finding incongruity and have a whimsical frame of mind" (Costa, 1991, 103). It's known that laughter transcends all human beings and that it affects the body's physiological functions. This can include a drop in the pulse rate, a secretion of endorphin and an increase of oxygen in the blood. It's also known to liberate creativity and provoke such higher level thinking skills as anticipation, finding novel relationships, and visual imagery. People who behave intelligently can perceive situations from an original and often humorous vantage point. They need to initiate humor more often . . ." (Costa 1991, 103). "Both humor and creativity depend largely on our being able to see something in more than the obvious, expected way" (Parnes 1981, 35).

Davis surmises that creative people would most likely share some of the following traits:

"They are aware of their creativity; independent, self-confident, enthusiastic, spontaneous, adventurous, thorough, curious, have wide interests, good sense of humor, playful, childlike, artistic interests, aesthetic interest, idealistic, reflective, needs for privacy, and are attracted to novelty, complexity, and the mysterious." (Davis 1986, 31)

Experts in the fields of psychology and science have the ensuing thoughts about creative thinking.

No Unified Psychological Theory. .

"We freely use such terms as imagination, ingenuity, innovation, intuition, invention, discovery and originality, interchangeably with ‘creativity." (Freeman, Butcher and Cristie 1986 in Davis 1991, 14)

Davis (1991) continues with a quotation from Nichols (1972).

". . . the term creativity is used with something approaching (reckless) abandon by psychologists. . . and people in general." Davis 1991, 14)

Creativity is Like the Scientific Method..                                                                      

Torrence (1977) thinks that creativity is like the scientific method:

"That the creative person will be able to sense gaps in information or problems, they will then form ideas and hypothesis, they test and modify these hypotheses and finally communicate the results." (Torrence in Costa 1991, 16)

B.F. Skinner proposes that even if there is creativity it would not exist because we really didn't create it. Skinner, associated with his theory of behaviorism, studies a person's visible behavior, instead of the many gestalt activities that may be occurring simultaneously.

". . . since we have no freedom, and all of our behavior is controlled by those who give us reinforcements and punishments, that we should not accept the dignity which comes from personal achievements, as these were really determined by the people who handed out the rewards and the punishments." (Skinner in Davis 1986, 25)

With all the definitions and thoughts that endure in the domains of science, medicine, and education, it is suggested that we consciously search for and accept paradigm change that is occurring today, and to support those that are working for these changes. Buckminster Fuller felt strongly about societies' need to mentally relocate into a new paradigm consciousness

"We are going to have to spread our wings of intellect and fly or perish; that is, we must dare immediately to fly by the generalized principles governing the universe and not by the ground rules of yesterday's superstitious and erroneously conditioned reflexes. And as we attempt competent thinking we immediately begin to reemploy our innate drive for comprehensive understanding. (Fuller 1971, 52)

Stand Under Their Own Stars.

Marilyn Ferguson ,quotes Herman Hesse when he said, "Every life stands beneath its own star." She continues with, "The transformed self has new tools, gifts, sensibilities. Like an artist, it spies pattern; it finds meaning and its own inescapable originality. Like a good scientist the transformed self experiments, speculates, invents and relishes the unexpected." (Ferguson 1980, 85).

Personal Reflections on C.C.T.

On reflection, there are as many definitions of critical and creative thinking as there are people who have consciously expressed themselves. The author adds to these definitions with his personal understanding of critical and creative thinking. 

"c.c.t. is an unfolding process, a process of discovery, and of self awareness. Awareness in the sense that there is a choice, while typing, to continue typing this line, or to skip a line, even though it would not be appropriate. There is a choice of making these words italics or bold, or even assigning numbers (1. , 2. , 3.) to them, where they don't belong, according to current paradigms of writing. An important part of being a critical and creative thinker incorporates enhanced awareness and intrinsic freedom. It includes the ability to step outside of governing rules or structures of society. The use of c.c.t. must also acknowledge, and use, the responsibility and integrity of personal thoughts, actions, and responsibility."

Critical and Creative Thinking is Caught not Taught.

The following is an addendum to the previous definition that said, "critical and creative thinking cannot be taught" (Costa1991, 87). This author's suggestion is, 

"It is caught, caught in the sense of knowing. A persons' knowing they are capable of more, and actually taking the actions necessary to become more."

"When the mind is thinking, it is talking to itself." (Plato in Costa 1991, 102)


CHAPTER  THREE

Overview

What homeopathic medicine is, the theories it was built upon, how it was discovered, how it works, along with a biography of Hahnemann, are topics of this chapter. Information is presented with the spirit of the pendulum of paradigm change, which is again swinging back toward the general acceptance of homeopathic medicine. Homeopathy is an alternative to much that is not working in the accepted, traditional, medicine of today. This chapter aspires to establish that the very laws of cures, associated with homeopathy, are connected to more profound universal laws. The evidence for this comes from various writers' statements and interpretations, gathered from present and past centuries. Discussion originates during ancient days, and proceeds to current times, showing similarities of ancient thinkers, to creativity and paradigm change. For comparison traditional medical treatments are included to show the methods that Hahnemann had to work with, and part of the reason he would become disillusioned with his own, traditional medical understandings. A homeopathic foundation that has withstood much debate and criticism is discovered next. The following quotation asks a question similar to one Homeopaths have asked of traditional paradigm understandings for many centuries, and continue to ask today.

"Macro sphere. Why will you refuse to listen to reason? I had hoped to find you-as being a man of sense and an accomplished mathematician-a fit apostle for the gospel of the three Dimensions, which I am allowed to preach once only in a thousand years: But now I know not how to convince you. Stay, I have it. Deeds, and not words, shall proclaim the truth. Listen, my friend." (Abbott 1952, 77)


Dr Samuel Hahnemann M.D. - Arrives

No thesis that includes homeopathy would be complete without addressing aspects of the life of its founder. This history is included in order to give the reader a reflective view of the events that contributed to the founding of homeopathy.

Early Support In Sam Hahnemanns Life.

He was born Samuel Christian Frederich Hahnemann, on April 10, 1755, at Meissen, Germany. His father decided early to give his son "lessons in Thinking," drawing heavily on his own readings of Rousseau. At five years old his father started to give thinking lessons to his young son, with the admonition to "prove all things" and to "hold fast to that which is good." Because of his fathers early teachings in thinking, Hahnemann was advanced in his education at the age of twelve. Advanced enough for an appointment by his schoolmaster, to tutor his younger schoolmates in the Greek language.

Dad's Support.

Hahnemanns father wanted that his son obtain an education, however, he had conflict over needing his son around the house to help with the many chores. It must have been with great disparity that he frequently took him out of school for assistance at home. However, it was to late as Samuel had already obtained a burning desire for an education (Haehl 1971). Later in his life, he thanks his father for his early guidance during his childhood.

My father died four years ago, without being deeply versed in science. He was a painter for the porcelain factory of the town, the author of the brief treatise on water- colour painting. He had found for himself the soundest conceptions of that which was good and can be called worthy of man. These ideas he implanted in me, "to act and live without pretence and show," was his most noteworthy precept, which impressed me more by his example than by his words. He was frequently present, though unobserved, where something good was about to be accomplished. Should I not follow Him? (Haehl 1971 10)

Rousseau's Influence.

Hahnemann often mentions that his father had read to him from Jean Jacques Rousseau, and from these frequent readings his father imparted much of the philosophy of Rousseau. He may have even read the following passage of Rousseau's writings to his son.

Integrity of the heart, when fortified by reason, produces an accurate mind. A good man almost always thinks accurately; and with a little experience, one who has been accustomed from infancy not to confuse himself when he reflects, nor to yield himself to present pleasure, until he has weighed the consequences and balanced the advantages, has nearly all the requirements for forming the judgement. It seems, indeed, that good sense depends more on the sentiments of the heart than on the clearness of the mind . . . (Boyd 1962, 31)

Schoolmaster's Support.

Recognizing Hahnemann's talent was not being employed fully, Hahnemann's schoolmaster, approached Hahnemann senior. He suggested that the younger Hahnemann be allowed to finish his schooling uninterrupted, while personally offering to pay for the son's school expenses. The father relented and allowed Samuel to return to school. Later, at the age of twenty years, Samuel would receive $20. , and his father's blessings. This included permission to leave home, and journey to Leipzig, Germany to attend college. In Leipzig, he would busy himself attending lectures during the day, and translating English texts into German at night. To earn additional money, he tutored German and French to a fellow student (Haehl 1971).

Dr. Von Quaring.

During Hahnemann's stay in Leipzig he made the acquaintance, and later friendship, of Dr. Von Quaring. The doctor was known for his successful practice in medicine, and for the celebrity status of his patients, patients such as the Emperor Joseph. Dr. Quaring treated Hahnemann as his own son, and not only allowed him to visit patients with him, but actually acquired for Hahnemann, the position of physician and Librarian to the Governor of Siedenburgen, Germany.

The Governor.

Hahnemann worked for the Governor for two years, cataloging his vast collection of books and coins. He would spend his nights reading and studying the collection of books, which became his work during the day. At twenty-four he was ready to continue his studies at the University of Erlangen, Germany. On his resume he was able to state that he had tutored himself in Latin, English, Hebrew, Italian, Syraic, Arabic, Spanish, and some Chaldaic. He had also improved on his familiar Greek and German (Haehl 1970).

Hahnemann Works On Translating.

In 1784, Hahnemann translated DeMachy's work, The Art of Manufacturing Chemical Products. Hahnemann not only translated but improved upon the writing and made many suggestions for change. He became quite sought after for his editing expertise. This work increased his knowledge and lead to more of a complete understanding and referencing of material.

Some examples of Hahnemann's editing expertise are attested to when Demachy writes, "I know little of the work of carbonification of turf." Hahnemann, while editing DeMachy's work, added six different examples of this "turf" in his notes to the author. Where Demachy spoke of a rare Italian book, Hahnemann not only cited the book, but related further details from it. Demachy wrote of a French writer, without giving his name. Hahnemann not only added the name of the Frenchman but, the work that Demachy was trying to relate too (Haehl 1971).

Paradigm du Jour

           The Doctrine Of Phlogiston.

Prior to the discussion of Doctor Hahnemanns' departing traditional medicine, and the development of homeopathy, it is appropriate for the reader to understand the existing doctrines that influenced the medicine he worked with, and some of the treatments that were currently in use during the 1700s.

Until Lavoisier's discoveries, (late 1770s), the teachings of John Joachim Becher (1635-1683) and those of G.E. Stahl (1660-1734), were the accepted paradigms. Lavoisier's teachings were slowly replacing alchemy and Phlogiston. The doctrine of Phlogiston was known as the "Inflammable Principle." According to this principle nothing in the world was capable of burning without this principle being at work.

An example of paradigm and paradigm change considers that in the 1990s, a chemist might ask the question, "Of what known elements is this or that substance composed of "? Whereas, in the 1700s the question may have sounded more like, "What unknown something lies hidden in a substance?"

Societies struggle to understand the paradigm of Phlogisticated air was taking place when Samuel Hahnemann and Lavoisier were doing research in chemistry, in 1744. Lavoisier showed that water does not change to earth, as the current paradigm taught, but that it was composed of Hydrogen and Oxygen. That same year he explained that the increase in weight that takes place when metals are oxyadised, [sic] occurs because of incorporation of air (Ameke 1875).

Lavoisiers' Exact Measurements.

In the years 1774, 1780 and in 1783, Lavoisier published his experiments, with an exactness that was previously unknown. He proved that the increase of weight that takes place when Phosphorous and Sulphur are burnt, is equal to the loss of the weight of the air in which the burning takes place. He concluded, that the ingredient of air, which was transferred to the burnt substance, was the constituent common to all acids, therefore he called it "Oxygen" (known as Sauerstoff, in German). This changed forever, the paradigm of the 1700s (Haehl 1970, 407).

Lavoisier loses his head to Robespiere. In the year 1794, to raise much needed research money, Lavoisier accepted the government post of Farmer-General. During this employment he was challenged to account for some deed. It was because of Robespiere's displeasure with the results of Lavoisier's work, that he was guillotined on May 8, 1794. Fortunately, Lavoisier's work became accepted, and by the year 1799 his ideas were the new paradigm and were commonly in use, as some continue to be today (Ameke 1875).

Hahnemann's Study Of Chemistry.

After graduation from the University of Erlangen, Hahnemann moved to Dessau, Germany (1781) and turned his attention to the study of chemistry. He would later receive an appointment to practice medicine in the town of Gommern, Germany.

Hahnemann's chemical tests. Hahnemann was not only busy doing translations and making others' works more refined, but was experimenting and developing his own tests for muriatic acid and sulfuric acid. He called attention to the use of too much magnesia in the brine of salt works, and introduced a method of separation. Hahnemann created careful experiments on the subject of crystallization, the solubility of salts at different temperatures, and the possibility of separating them by means of crystallization. He also investigated many useful ideas for the detection of impurities in chemicals. All of this work prepared him for his later insights and the founding of homeopathy.

Professor Henke, writing in the Homeopathic Journal, Archiv Für Medic. Erfahrüngen, wrote, "Hahnemann's new test for the presence of Arsenic in the body . . . The classical work of Dr. Hahnemann, on Arsenic, by means of which the best modes of analyzing Arsenic were introduced into medical jurisprudence" (Haehl 1971, 622).

Hahnemann is also credited with the introduction of dilute acids into chemical use, and the determination of their specific gravities, these tests closely approach the methods of modern day labs.

In 1795, in the Journal der Pharmacie, Hahnemann explained what he called his Wine Test. This test was used to decide the presence of lead in wine, used as a sweetener by the wine-makers. Today, due to paradigm changes, scientists know that lead can be responsible for cramps, colic, brain dysfunction and death (Haehl 1971).

During Hahnemann's life, (1755-1843) the traditional medicine, was based on assumption that "humours" caused illness. The paradigm of that time stated that "every means available should accomplish humour removal." The following list illustrates methods that were commonly used for humour [sic] removal.

The Cautery.

This procedure consisted of a white hot iron rod, or some chemical agent that would burn. Doctors employed it to dig deep into the body, and then they inserted dried peas into the incision. They finally sealed this with an application of compressive bandages, and continued to add a fresh supply of dried peas daily.

The Seton.

In this procedure the doctor pinched up, the flesh of the patient, and made an incision. A skein of cotton or silk was inserted, then on later checking of the wound, part of the skein was drawn out. The saturated part was cut off, to await more saturation and another doctors visit. Setons were usually applied to the back of the head to draw out foul humours. Additionally, they applied the Seton to the region of the heart to "clean and polish it up." The doctors used the Seton on other parts of the body as they felt it was needed.

Bleeding and Blistering.

These procedures were commonplace. In addition, doctors would apply Arsenic, to coat the wounds that resulted. As a result, many thousands of patients would die of Arsenic poisoning. Bloodletting was among the favorites of treatments and has been revived today, for current use in removing dead tissue and gangrenous areas (Haehl 1971).

Hahnemann Steps Away From Orthodox Medicine

The above practices set the stage for Hahnemann to search for alternatives in  medicine, that eliminated the above practices, and replaced them with homeopathic medicine, which gave a scientific approach to the of medicine of the era. During Hahnemanns' stay in Gommern, he became dissatisfied with the medicine that he was  practicing, because of all its side-effects and poisonings. In fact, he began to question the very fundamentals of medicine as it was known. The outcome was that he suspended his practice of medicine and continued to make a living by translating medical texts. In his spare time he verified, and tested, his theories about medicine using healthy human beings. Eventually he named his new theory homeopathy, creating a new medical paradigm of the day.

Dissatisfaction With Orthodox Medicine.

Homeopathy was developed in the late 1700s, by Dr. Samuel Hahnemann, M.D. of Germany. He received his M.D. at Erlangen, Germany, but because of his dissatisfaction and searching, he would unknowingly build upon previously mentioned, century old paradigms of medicine. Medicine needed an investigator, like Hahnemann, to put the pieces together, form a discipline, and therefore foster paradigm change.

He Discovers The Theory.

Hahnemann, was translating Cullen's Materia Medica, a compilation of many medicines, and the results of Cullen's testing them. He found himself disagreeing with the author's premise as he relates . . . .

I made the first pure experiment with Chinchona Bark upon myself, and thereby discovered its power of exciting the familiar symptoms of intermittent fever. With this first trial, it broke upon me the dawn, that has since brightened into the most brilliant day of medical art, that it is only by their power to make the healthy human beings ill, that the medicines can cure morbid states; and even so, only such morbid states whose symptoms the selected drug itself can produce in the healthy. (Haehl, 1971 328)

Subsequently, Hahnemann moved to the town of Dresden, Germany and published numerous books on chemistry, and created many new forms of chemical testing, as mentioned earlier (Haehl 1971).

Prominent Homeopathic Supporters    

Hahnemann was a hard worker and was 89 when he died. As shown in Appendices A., he wrote 116 large works and approximately 120 pamphlets. According to Hahnemann himself, "He was always filling gaps in his education."

If like attracts like, as homeopathy believes, than what do the following notables have in common in the ways that they filled their own gaps of education?

The Duke of Glouster; Edward the VIII; Elizabeth Palmer Peabody; Elizabeth Stuart Phelps; Emanuel Swedenborgian; George the VI; Harriet Beecher Stowe; Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; Horace Greeley; Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe; John D. Rockefeller Sr.; Julia Ward Howe; Louisa May Alcott; Mahatma Gandi; Mark Twain and Mary Baker Eddy (Haehl 1970, 28). Nathaniel Hawthorn; President McKinley; Princess Mary Adelaide; Queen Adelaide; Queen Elizabeth of England, and The Royal Family; Theodore Parker; Thomas Starr King; Thomas Wentworth Higginson; Thomas Bailey Aldrich; Wendell Philips; William Cullen Bryant; William Seward; William Lloyd Garrison; William James; Yehudi Menuhin; Dizzie Gillespie; Mother Teresa and Tina Turner. (Ullman 1988, 2)

The answer is, they are, or were, all proponents and users of homeopathic medicine.

Not everyone is a proponent of Homeopathy, as you will discover if you visit the following link. These two men are MDs, supposed educated men. And yet, they put down  Homeopathy, which has over 1 million web sites on the Internet, many of them run by MDs. They have not taken the time to discover. To discover a medicine that is still chosen by the Royal Family in England, and used by countless millions throughout the world. To discover a safe and inexpensive form of treatment

Current Day Testimonials

In more recent periods the following people attest to their encounters with homeopathy.

Dizzy Gillespie.

There have been two revelations in my life-- the first was bebop and the second, homeopathy (Gillespie in Ullman 1988, 2).

Tina Turner.

Life in the fast lane wore me down, changes in my diet and homeopathy saved me. Thanks to my Homeopathic physician, For bringing me back to health and always being available for me (Turner in Ullman 1988, 3).

Yehudi Menuhin.

Homeopathy is the safest and more reliable approach to ailments and has withstood the assaults of established medical practice for over one hundred years (Menuhin in Ullman 1988, 3)

William Tyler. Chairperson of Materials and Science Engineering Dept. at Sanford University, California. . .

It is clear that we are going out of the age of chemical and mechanical medicine into the age of energetic and Homeopathic medicine. (Tyler in Ullman 1988, 3)

Charles Menninger M.D. According to Dr. Menninger, Founder of the Menninger Clinic.

Homeopathy is wholly capable of satisfying the therapeutic demands of this age better than any other system of medicine. (Menninger in Ullman 1982, 12)

President of A.M.A.

Malcolm Todd, a former President of the A.M.A., while speaking, as President, at an A.M.A. conference in San Diego, California, endorsed alternative medicine. Later, in Houston, Texas, when speaking to an extremely traditional medical audience he said,

Orthodox medicine needs to take an aggressive role in the integration of holistic approaches into mainstream medicine, as they promise an exciting rejuvenation of Western medicine. That this interaction might include biofeedback and the psychology of consciousness to paranormal phenomena, physic healing etc. . .(Todd in Ferguson, 1980)

Sir William Osler Supports Homeopathy.

From the Journal Of the American Medical Association (J.A.M.A., 258, July 3, 1987), Sir William Osler is quoted from his farewell address to the American medical profession, Osler said:

It is not as if our Homeopathic brothers are asleep; far from it, they are awake . . . The original grievous mistake was ours . . .to quarrel with our brothers about Infintismals was a most unwise and stupid thing to do. (Osler in Ullman 1987, 3)

Atomic Body

What have these people been supporting? Ferguson and Gerber give further insight into homeopathy. Marilyn Ferguson explaining that the body is very sensitive and works on a very minute atomic level.

Belatedly, half a century after we should have taken the hint from physics, Western medicine is beginning to recognize that the body is a process a bioelectric whirlpool, sensitive to positive ions, cosmic rays, trace minerals in our diet, free electricity from power generators. (Ferguson 1980, 256)

Dr. Richard Gerber seconds the thoughts of Ferguson when he contributes the following:

The discoveries of pathways that bind the brain and the immune system rescues the behavioral approach to disease (homeopathy) from the shadowy practices of the witch doctors and places it squarely within the rational tradition of western medicine. We are witnessing the birth of a new integrative science, psychoneurimmunology, which begins with the premise that neither the brain nor the immune system can be excluded from any scheme that proposes to account for the onset and course of human disease. (Gerber 1988, 480

                                             © 1997 David Cleveland


C H A P T E R I V

Homeopaths work with manifested body symptoms that characterize good health, or the lack of it. The homeopath depends on being able to interpret a set of symptoms that are available when a person is in a state of disease, or imbalance. These manifested symptoms are used as guidelines, to discover remedies (medicines) that a patient's system needs, to return it to a state of balance (health). After taking a detailed history of the patient's past and current symptoms, the homeopath will consult repertories and materia medicas (portrayed next) to finish the patient's consultation. Such an evaluation will take from one to three hours to complete.


Following is an analysis of the patient evaluation, along with the tools and techniques  personally changed and added to this evaluation, creating an evaluation that additionally considers ‘drainage' of the mental and physical toxins of the body. This ‘drainage' is accomplished before giving the most indicated remedy to the patient.

Tools of the Homeopath

The Repertory Resource Books.

Kents' Repertory, (<<--LINK) contains a very precise listing on 1,531 pages of mental and physical symptoms. The Repertory starts with a 100-page listing of mind symptoms alone. Included in these mind symptoms are anxieties, fears, delusions, apprehensions, dreams, and more. The book continues to list symptoms for other parts of the body, starting with head symptoms, and proceeding down the body to foot symptoms. The book provides a listing, besides each listed symptom, of the most common homeopathic remedies for that particular symptom.

The homeopath then continues to examine other symptoms given them by the patient, while keeping track of the remedies that are beginning to emerge. At the end of the list of symptoms the homeopath will have a sizable list of corresponding remedies. At this point they will choose the most indicated 10-20 remedies, open a Materia Medica and research each of the indicated remedies. This will reduce the possibilities even further

The Materia Medica Resource Books.

Just as there are many repertories there are also many authors of materia medicas, W. Boericke, M.D. has written a very popular one. These Materia Medicas contain a comprehensive listing of the remedies actions on various parts and systems of the body. A process of elimination will occur as the homeopath reads about each of the indicated remedies, and determines which of these remedies has the most symptoms of the patient in question. This process allows the homeopath to discover the best possible choice of remedies for the patient. The homeopath is assured, on reading these descriptions, with the knowledge that each remedy has been tested on thousands of healthy volunteers, and have been described in the words of these volunteer provers.

Homeopathy's Rules Of Cure.

The rules of homeopathy, and its theories, have been working for more than 180 years. These human organism rules were first noticed by Dr. Constantine Hering (1800- 1880). Hering is known for establishing Hannemans' homeopathic medicine in the United States. After much research and observation, Hering formulated the following rules, to guide the homeopath in his healing.

Rule One.

Healing takes place from the top of the body and proceeds downward. This means that a person's headache, mental state etc., will improve before any improvement will occur in lower parts of the body.

Rule Two.

The body will heal the most important organ first and continue to heal in the direction of the least important organ..

Rule Three.

Healing occurs in the inner areas of the body first and than healing will move outward to external parts of the body. This means that skin symptoms will be the last to heal.

Rule Four.

Symptoms will disappear in reverse order. A person's problem today, will be healed first, and then any suppressed problems from the past will come back to be healed, in order of their suppression.

With these homeopathic rules as a guideline, the homeopath does not acknowledge a difference between mental and physical illness. Instead they see one, as having traits of the other. In treating a person, both are considered. (Coulter 1972)

Abstract Rules and Theories.

For comparison, it is noted that a traditional patient's ‘symptom descriptions' are taken from them and entered into a different semantic system. Into a set of abstract rules and theories that are fed back to them in a way that they are not meant to understand. Ill persons have their sickness taken from them, depriving the patient of words to discuss their problem. This leaves them with the latest scientific measurements, and the doctors understanding of what these measurements could mean. These become the guidelines to healing and recommendations are, to take this or that drug, in order for your sick body to come back within the normal range of scientific measurements. The patient follows the doctor's findings-to be better . . . little is ever spoken about cure.


Dr. Wallace Esterbrook, a former surgeon and now a practicing psychiatrist shares: WE DOCTORS HAVE A PREDILECTION FOR NOUNS IN NAMING DISEASES--EPILEPSY, MEASLES, BRAIN TUMOR . . . , AND BECAUSE THESE THINGS "DESERVE" NOUNS AS NAMES, THEN OBVIOUSLY THEY ARE THINGS TO US. IF YOU TAKE ONE OF THESE NOUNS- MEASLES, AND MAKE IT INTO A VERB, THEN IT BECOMES, "MRS. JONES, YOUR LITTLE BOY APPEARS TO BE MEASLING." WHICH OPENS BOTH YOUR MIND AND HERS TO THE CONCEPT OF DISEASE AS A PROCESS. (ESTERBROOK ON W.G.B.H TELEVISION 1993)

We doctors have a predilection for nouns in naming diseases--epilepsy, measles, brain tumor . . . , and because these things "deserve" nouns as names, then obviously they are things to us. If you take one of these nouns- measles, and make it into a verb, then it becomes, "Mrs. Jones, your little boy appears to be measling." Which opens both your mind and hers to the concept of disease as a process. (Esterbrook on W.G.B.H Television 1993)

Vital Force and Homeopathy

The term ‘vital force,' used earlier, does not refer to, or subscribe to, any ancient, mystical procedures. Vital force relates to the homeopaths' respect for an unknown healing force. The humility of nature and its' workings is always a reminder to the homeopath, not to make an attempt to ‘know it all,' and too allow individual disease patterns to vary from person to person.

Homeopathy and Ultimate Indeterminacy

In stressing the ultimate lack of knowledge of the body's functioning, physiologically and mentally, homeopathy tends to show agreement with Jungian analytical psychology and with theoretical physics. These disciplines both accept the ultimate indeterminacy of the phenomena investigated, and call for a symbolic "as If" approach to their understanding. (Coulter 1972, 10)

The following observations are made with the author's background of   having studied and worked with Naturopathic medicine; studies and philosophies of   Arica Institute; Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness; participation in several Insight Training programs; training in Zen tradition; study of macrobiotic disciplines; study of Iridology; and the experience of having worked with more than six thousand clients.

Once the client arrives, an immediate observation consists of . . . Their posture   Their movement Quality of their voice   Their physical appearance   Brightness of their eyes and if any spots are showing in the pupil   The feeling of their hand (moist, oily, dry, calloused)   Personal opinions . . do they appear to be suppressing anger or sadness?  Subtle sensations, "as if" (as if, bugs were crawling . . . )

       All of the above are considered in the analysis and overall treatment of a client.

Multiple observation perspectives. By observing a client's particular postures and movements the homeopathic observer may be able to determine if they are carrying burdening psychological baggage. Posture may also reveal the client's level of confidence in themselves. From these observations it can be determined what is needed to start the actual evaluation (workup). The patient may be offered something to eat or drink. Then the conversation to begin the search for symptomology can commence. Determining the comfort level of the person in new surroundings is important, along with paying attention to how they explain themselves. Observation continues as the homeopath watches the patient sitting in their chair, and interprets their body language.

Listening to the patientor. By listening to the person describe themselves and their symptoms, the homeopath obtains information that will be researched in the materia medicas and repertories. The homeopath is concerned about the many varied traits that make up the whole person and will directly and indirectly elicit answers as to their confidence, sadness, anger, etc. . . . When appropriate, they ask a question, to delve deeper into the understanding of a concern, or symptom, and its causal history. A recent example is that of a man that was being evaluated. He was diagnosed (by traditional medicine) as having leukemia with only a short period of life left. All during the homeopathic evaluation he was cracking jokes and making light of his problem. This led to a quantum leap question of, "had he ever been suicidal in his life?" Whereupon, he answered "yes." His answer helped to discover suppressed events and grief that caused, or supported his problem. A more obvious type of (symptom) is the whining type of voice. This person may be asked, "Do you feel you have everything that you need in your life, and if not, what's missing, what do you need?"

Up Front Evidence. On shaking hands with a client detecting a sense of comfort with a new situation is possible. It can also show their assurance or ambivalence with their being, by the pressure of their grip. Through the feeling of their hand determination can be made as to the condition of their heart and their kidneys (using macrobiotic observational techniques). For example, the hand will be moist if they are overworking the kidneys, and the hand will feel fat or bloated, if they overwork the heart. Often this is just a temporary condition but, it is something to be taken into consideration for use in a total workup.

Carrying the weight of the world. If the person is carrying abundant physical baggage, such as books, shopping-bag's etc., it may be a key to that the persons not feeling they have enough, or are personally not good enough. As a result they have to carry their baggage around as a support mechanism. This might lead to researching remedies that include a mental feeling of ‘lack'.

The starting place can be anywhere. The actual work up will start at a place that will most likely be different for each client. It may start by asking them to write out their information on the front of an exam book. Or It might start by talking immediately about their reason for the visit. Above all, it is made clear initially that there is nothing they can say that will be judged as unimportant, ridiculous or stupid.

Guiding the questions, not asking. During the work-up a homeopath will purposefully not ask many direct questions. Instead the homeopath will ask questions that guide the patient in their answers. This is established to obtain information that uses a patient's own words. Their own words are very important, because the information contained in the materia medicas and the repertory books, are words of healthy people (not symptoms obtained by traditional medicine's ill patients, guinea pigs, rabbits, monkeys . . . ). These healthy people are used as provers to test homeopathic medicines and have answered in their own words what they experienced after taking a particular homeopathic remedy. A person proving a remedy, states to the master prover, (In charge of collecting symptoms), that they are feeling depressed, very talkative, and want to be constantly busy. In addition, they suffer from a sore throat (on the left side only), and experience the inability to wear shirts with tight collars, along with other symptoms. The homeopath will use these symptoms to prescribe the appropriate, similar remedy. From reading the homeopathic materia medicas and repertory books, the substance described above (by its symptoms) is most likely the medicine (remedy) ‘Lachesis'. The homeopath will be guided with the knowledge that the particular substance being proven, taken in a crude dose, or repeated frequently, can cause the above complaints. The homeopath also knows that if a diluted form of Lachesis is taken, (a homeopathic dose) balance will return to the patients' body. Therefore, the law of, ‘like cures like.'

If the homeopathic patient states the same symptoms as listed above, the homeopath will add this remedy ‘Lachesis' to the list of possible remedies that are being considered for this person, now. ‘Now,' is underscored anticipating the same person returning years later and having new, or different, symptoms.

The chart that follows lists several critical and creative thinking concepts and compares these ideas with how the author, as a homeopathic practitioner, uses them for a patient work-up, evaluation.

Table 4.2 Personal Evaluation Techniques                  

Personal Empowerment: Costa pg 100

The homeopathic evaluation allows the patient insight into their disease/ imbalance. The depth and variety of questioning allow this to occur during the interview. The evaluation is used as a foundation for the person to approach treating themselves for future medical events.

Open to Being Wrong: Einstein pg 103

A Homeopath has to constantly reevaluate a patients symptoms, and only use past problems as history. They view each new patient or complaint as a new entity. The Homeopath treats a failure in finding the correct remedy as an adventure and challenge.

Suspend Judgement Paul pg 99

Homeopathic goals are not to give a patient a medical diagnosis, a disease label. Most Homeopaths will conduct their work-up/evaluation using a quite room, pleasant music, soft lighting, perhaps light snacks, along with a casual manner of dress, to convey the relaxed, nonjudgmental process.

Thrive on Incongruity Cornett pg 103

Homeopaths do not force the patients symptoms to fit a predetermined disease category/name. They listen carefully and find the many incongruities of the patients disease and use these as supporting evidence for the discovery of the correct medicines. For example, if the patient needs the medication, Arsenicum Album, than they would have a hot head and the rest of their body would be chilly or cold. They may crave water or be totally thirst-less. They would also be experiencing fear.

Conceptualize the Whole Paul pg 99

Homeopaths need to understand the entire person and all of the patients symptoms will have importance. During the evaluation the patient's nutritional habits are considered, along with their mind state (fears, anxieties, worries, beliefs . . . ) along with their physical pains and discomforts.

Collaboration Reich pg 99

The Homeopath uses all available sources in their search for complaints and patient symptoms. A collaborative environment prevails when a patient describes his/her problems/symptoms, during which they are treated with respect and equality. Homeopaths are also open to using orthodox medical tests and advice from orthodox medical doctors when they feel that this collaboration will be helpful to the patient.

Two Different Approaches

Classical Homeopathy.

Most orthodox homeopaths will give a remedy that has the majority of outstanding characteristics of the patients symptoms and they will let that remedy work until they need another dose. They know this approach as Classical Homeopathy. However, it does create discharges and sometimes is even blocked from working because of the lack of drainage remedies.

Drainage Homeopathy.

Another approach is to give remedies that will specifically antidote the following from the system before giving the above classical remedy.

Aluminum: to antidote aluminum in the system

X-ray: to antidote the bad effects of excessive X-ray's to the organism.

Thuja: to antidote the residual effects of   immunization shots.

Natrum Muriaticum: to antidote deep suppressed grief.

Nux Vomica: to antidote the bad effects of previous poisonings (alcohol, food, drugs . )

After the administration of the drainage remedies, the remedies that are indicated for the deeper complaints of the patient will be given.

During the client's evaluation the homeopath does not have to ask questions in exact order, but will be guided not to forget questioning in each category. The homeopath will also keep in mind the rules of healing, listed at the start of this chapter, when doing the work-up. Not listed, but to be considered during the work-up (evaluation), are the many shades of generalities that will accompany a symptom. For instance mind symptoms are considered the most important symptoms and if a client complained about anxiety the homeopath would want to determine the following generalities.

At what time of day?                                                     

Where in the body is anxiety located?

What ameliorates the anxiety? (Heat, walking, not thinking about it. . . .)

What makes the anxiety worse?

When was the first occurrence?

Does the weather play a part? If so, what type of weather?

Are there accompanying physical symptoms?

Table 4.3 Evaluation Framework

MIND A-Z (Abandoned-Zest). What mind symptoms are observable, what can be elicited by self or others, including records?

HEAD, Inner, outer Location of pain/sensations; do these extend to distant areas. Inflammations?

pain;EYES, vision Heaviness; discharges; distortions; eruptions; inflammation; pain; photophobia; staring; spasms etc., vision blurred; colors; distortions; etc.?

NOSE, smell, breathing Discharge; bleeding; obstruction; smell- acute, lost. Pain; sensitivity sneezing?

EARS, hearing Discharges; pulling or boring fingers into; eruptions; sensitivity; ulceration; illusions; impairment?

MOUTH, taste tongue, teeth, gums Taste; putrid, sour, acrid, alkaline, aromatic, astringent, bitter, chalky, cheesy, clammy, earthy, pasty, like eggs, like food long eaten, rancid, sweet, salty, sawdust, slimy, smoky, sour, sooty, soapy, straw-like, sulphur etc.

Tongue; cracking, shape, discoloration, coating; bleeding etc.. Teeth; decay, distortion, pain, elongation, grinding, sensitive. Gums; bleeding, sensitive, pain etc.?

FACE & LIPS Eruptions; pain; distortion; bloating; cracked lips etc. ?

THROAT swallowing Inflammation; location, type of pain, sticking, sharp, shooting, extends to...; craving cold or hot drinks, or applications?

CHEST Respiration Heaviness; pains; growth; palpitation; exaggerated , breathing; tension; numbness etc.?

CHEST Respiration Heaviness; pains; growth; palpitation; exaggerated , breathing; tension; numbness etc.?

ABDOMEN, upper and lower Cramping; bloating; coldness; heat; pain; etc.?

STOMACH, digestion Cramping; regurgitation; swelling; appetite; cravings and aversions; gurgling; indigestion; nausea etc.?

BACK, upper, lower Pains; distortion; posture; injuries; cracking; cramps; growths; weaknesses etc.?

EXTREMITIES, movement. Arms & legs-upper, lower. Knees and elbows. Pains; injuries; awkwardness; coldness or heat; constrictions; convulsions; cracking; cramps; discoloration; distortion; splitting of nails; emaciation; heaviness etc.?

GENITALIA, sex, elimination. Eruptions; discharges; pains; misplacement. Desire, excessive or lost. Various pains.

RECTUM, elimination. stool. Pains; eruptions; constipation; diarrhoea; urging; prolapse; swelling; flatus; inactivity; involuntary; stool shape and coating (mucus, blood) and color etc.?

TEMPERATURE, fever, chill Time of day; location; better by heat/ cold; restlessness; hallucinations; fear; apprehensions; paroxysms

SKIN ,perspiration, dryness Eruptions; dryness/oiliness; location; itching; blotches; elevations; ulcers etc.?

GENERALITIES, times, aggravations and ameliorations Despite the clients symptoms it's important to know if their problem is worse, or better by-heat, cold, pressure, light, sound, crowds, eating, and many other outside influences.

Sensations ‘As If.' Although a sensation is not the most important symptom, often it will be a helpful key to understanding the entire image that will arise from studying the symptoms as a complete picture. For instance a client may state that their anxiety creates a sensation ‘as if' they would have to jump off a bridge. Or that, the anxiety is ‘as if' they were being put into a vise and squeezed. Homeopaths' have books written on sensations ‘As If' where they can research even these small details.

Times of occurrence. Several books have been written that set the times of the persons malady. A person would mention that they wake up at 2 A.M. and can not get back to sleep until 1. They have eaten, 2. They have gone to the bathroom, 3. They meditate etc.. They may mention that their pains start at a certain time and then go


Homeopathic Dilutions and Small Numbers Information on ‘minuteness' is investigated, as the attenuations, or dilutions, of homeopathic remedies are the enigmatic component of homeopathy, and the most frequently misunderstood area of homeopathic medicine. It's the author's perception that the common lack of understanding of the minuteness of homeopathic substances may come from the belief that for a medicine to work, it must be observable under a microscope in its' original state. Further, its' measurements must be within the realm of the current paradigm of measurements, that it must be available for chemical testing, and at the very least, be able to make a patient somewhat infirm, before they are well again.

Fortunately, many researchers are performing work with the homeopathic micro- dilutions today, and are able to prove the existence and effectiveness of the homeopathic dilutions. Dilutions that have been a mystery over the past centuries, are now gaining credibility, owing to paradigm change and newer and more sophisticated machinery. It's of significance that the remedies have been successful over many centuries, despite researchers and practitioners abilities to actually observe the medicines chemistry.

Infintismals and the results of their use, have supported homeopathy for the past 180 years of homeopathic success.

Medical Paradigm And Tiny Numbers.                           

Fortunately, paradigm change has occurred in medicine, and mathematics. The following is an attempt to illustrate recent approaches of observing large and small numbers. After reading the following, it will be easier to apply the expert's thoughts and examples to the minute dilutions.

Was It Googol, or goo-goo? The reader is now introduced to a ‘Googol.' The young nephew of the American mathematician Edward Kosner invented the term googol. This occurred when Kosner asked, his nephew, to make up a name for a very large number. So today the Googol (perhaps Goo-goo in the original) is the number one followed by 100 zero's.

It looks like this. . . 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,

000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. (Davis 1961).

One million. How big is that? Let's start with another, more common, large number. What does one million (1,000,000) mean to most people? Winning the Lottery? More than a thousand?Here are a few examples. If someone gives you a dollar bill every two seconds, how long will it take for you to have one million dollars?

The answer: 24 days, 24 hours a day.

A calendar one million years old, would read approximately Eighth Century B.C..

Driving one million inches, a person will have traveled 16 miles.

Accepted numbers, in daily use. The following professionals use other magical, hard to conceptualize, numbers in their daily work. For instance, the scientist estimates  that the brain contains 10 to the 10th (1010) cells or neurons, and is far more complex than any computer. If this number, 1010 is further represented by dots that are 1/8th of an inch apart, the dotted line would extend half way around the earth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .  .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keep going. . . . . . .

Further examples, include the chemical Thyroxin, which is produced naturally by the thyroid gland. Used in research it can strongly influence the growth of tadpoles. This occurs when one drop of Thyroxin is added to five million drops of medium. Acetyl chlorides, cause a drop in blood pressure when present in proportion of one milligram to 500,000 gallons of blood. Histamine, provokes reactions in guinea pigs, in a dilution that is not detectable by micro-chemical analysis. Lysergic acid diethylamide (l.s.d.), in a quantity weighing only 1/200,000 of an ounce, is enough to create reactive hallucinations in the human mind (Illich 1976).

Researcher, H. Junker, added various substances, attenuated to 10-27) , to bacterial cultures, and found the growth of bacteria was affected. In addition, J. Paterson, when determining the Schick Test, to test for Diphtheria, discovered that the test results changed from positive to negative. This was accomplished by oral administration of Alum- precipitated toxoid in a dilution of 10-60. Using the homeopathic remedy Diphtherininum, in a dilution of 10-402 a reaction developed in yet another test (Illich 1976).

Even with these already excepted, large and minuscule numbers, many people still have a problem in their understanding minuscule numbers with which the homeopath works. Homeopathic remedies originate with dilutions of 10-30. ,which corresponds with, .000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,001. Homeopathic dilutions have been extended as high as 10  to the -100,000M.

Comparing Orthodox Medicine

Orthodox medicine comes close to homeopathy in their making chemicals for immunization shots. However, that's as close as they get. For instance in one year alone, 1978, the F.D.A. stated that one and one half million people, about the entire population of Boston, Massachusetts, needed hospitalization. Hospitalization because of drugs they had taken, on a doctor's prescription, to cure their complaints. Thirty percent of these people were further damaged by the therapy that they were given for the original mistakes (Townsend, 1992).

All Drugs Have Symptoms.

All traditional drugs contain the possibilities of serious symptoms. These symptoms may not occur until a year or two after the drug has been taken. This often leads the doctor, and the patient, to believe that they are still ill. From this they are given  even more drugs. This drugging leads to the death of an estimated 300,000 people a year (Sullivan 1991). This figure is three times the population of Cambridge, Massachusetts, dying every year.

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes.

If a doctor gave a placebo to one hundred of his patients, ninety of them would get better. (Holmes in Illich 1976, 142)

Drug Manufacturers.

There are approximately 2500 drugs that are currently available to the traditional physician. They are manufactured by 250 drug firms in the United States alone. These drugs are catalogued in the Physicians' Desk Reference'. Each of the manufacturing firms has an average of ten branches throughout the world. As can be imagined large amounts of time and money are being invested, and like any business, they must show a profit. As an example, to promote Valium, its' manufacturer (Hoffman and LaRouche) spent more than $200 million dollars on advertising. In addition, they commissioned two hundred medical doctors to write glowing testimonials, and scientific articles [sic], praising their drug (Illich, 1976 66).

Forbes magazines', Annual Report of American Industry, showed that in 1984, the drug industry's median net profit was 10.6%, three times that of other reported industries (Calafano 1986). This same report, in January of 1993, states the median net profit was at 22.4% (Forbes Jan. 4. 1993).

Dangerous drugs and excessive profits. Speaking of expensive drugs, Former Secretary Of U.S. Health Education and Welfare, Dr. Joseph A. Calafano cites the drug Centoxin. The drug is used to treat infections that a patient acquires as a result of a stay in a hospital. Its known to cause fatal toxic shock, and is sold for $3,800 per dose. Again, it's given to treat an infection that was accidentally acquired because of unsanitary conditions in their hospital. (Calafano 1986).

The drug companies cannot make a profit if the American public is not buying. However, the news is that they are buying, as never before. They are purchasing and thereby creating the following statistics. Seventy seven billion prescription pills, five billion of which are tranquilizers, are being sold in the 1990's. This makes the U.S. the most drug dependent nation in the world (Sullivan, 1991).

These are not encouraging figures if people are going to wake up, become critical and creative in their thinking, recognize paradigm and the need for paradigm change, and start taking responsibility. With the above consumption figures the ‘paradigm change message', won't even be heard, in a society drugged out of awareness.

There are some remedies worse than the disease. (Publilius Syrus , 42 B.C. Oxford 1980, 402)

Drugs are a delusion. George Bernard Shaw in the Doctors Dilemma, (1913), states, "Nature has provided . . . in the phagocytes . . . a natural means of . . . destroying  all disease germs. There is, at the bottom, only one genuine scientific treatment for all disease and that is nature" (Shaw in Townsend 1992, 52).

Dr. Arnold Mandell, a San Diego, California, psychiatrist states:

The use of drugs to treat everything from anxiety to insomnia, to schizophrenia itself has to be judged a failure. Few patients, if any, are cured. the most violent manifestations of mental illness can be controlled, but with what long term consequences, no one knows.

Dr. Mandell continues with,

One of the common drugs used for schizophrenia, actually makes the disorder worse, and that Tricyclic antidepressants, increase the rate of mood cycling, leading to long- term increases in the numbers of relapsing episodes. (Mandall in Gleick 1987, 298)

Personal Change        

The author was already quite involved in the research and study of herbs and their medicinal uses, and was slowly being drawn to the study of Naturopathy. Naturopathy is specific training in the nutrition, hygiene, and treatment of the patient with diet, colonics, body massage, vitamin supplements and homeopathy. As the name implies, natural care for the body.

The author's thinking was, "Within the universe and in all that exists in it, including all the named diseases, there must be some very simple answers to these diseases and they must be available to the honest searcher." From my understandings and readings of herbs and plants I recalled the following example. The plant known as Rhus Toxidendron, (Poison Ivy), grows quite successfully in many places. These are places where the unwary gardeners are, or where children are at play. This is where they may discover the effects of this shiny leafed renegade. The itching, soreness, welts on the skin and tendency to spread easily are well known and hard to forget. Less known, is the fact that in nature a plant called Jewel Weed, and another plant called Burdock, grow in close proximity to the poison ivy plant. Both plants will cure the familiar symptoms of ivy poisoning, by making an herbal tincture out of them and applying it to the affected skin. Armed with this simple awareness, I started my search for safe medicines, available from nature.



The author discovered homeopathy first and later, as a Naturopath, specialized in Homeopathy. Twenty years have elapsed, and more than six thousand clients have been interviewed and treated by the author. Out of that number, no one has become ill from taking homeopathic medicines. Most patients recovered from their complaints within a short period, usually less than three months. This is demonstrated by a handful of case histories that are dispensed. Many of the people in these case histories had been diagnosed and treated by traditional medicine, before attempting the homeopathic approach. The names have all been changed for confidentiality.

Homeopathic Case Histories.

Carol and her respiratory problems. Carol was 25 when she first had chest infections that invariably turned into pneumonia or bronchitis. She complained of being constantly on antibiotics, and of being well for only ten days out of the month. She was in a vicious cycle of taking antibiotics. She kept complaining to her doctors but they repeatedly told her that most of her problems were caused by her mental state. The doctors had her hospitalized as a psychotic, because of her many complaints and her general depression.

Her mother refused to accept the fact that Carol (then a child) was sick, and so Carol reacted, by suppressing her complaints from her family, until she started passing out during forced shopping trips. The patient stated in her letter to me. . .

In fact often as a teenager, I was in so much pain that I went to bed completely convinced that I would not wake up in the morning, I felt so sick-- I got as far as writing letters of goodbye but never told anyone of feeling bad . . . In the space of an hour I can go from being jovial and full of life too suicidal, and it still happens often. Today as an adult these infections still ruin my life. I cannot hold a job. I cannot go to school . . . It may seem amazing and irresponsible that I have hardly gone to doctors for the last ten years for this, but I have found them unable to hear me, and generally send me back to psychiatrists. (Patients' letter, 1970)

The author agreed to work with her, and did a three and ½ hour evaluation, suggested some months worth of individualized remedies, and asked her to return in four weeks. She didn't return however. A short note arrived in the mail about three months later, and read:

I wanted to write and tell you of the miracle you have worked on my health . . . About once a month I have a faint recurrence of infection, and I take a 1/4 teaspoon of remedy and no more illness. The bronchitis is completely under control! My life is very, very different not to be on antibiotics all the time, and I am supremely happy and forever grateful. Thank you very much!

Two year old's seizures. Carla wrote me with her sons health report. Her letter told of an acute problem she'd had with her 2-year-old son.

When my son, Damon was about two years old he suddenly started having choking seizures which lasted several minutes and then he would be fine. One was so violent that I took him to the emergency ward of a hospital, thinking something was stuck in his throat. They advised me to have him checked by his pediatrician as there was nothing lodged in his throat.

She took him to the pediatrician she had used since Damon was born. This doctor found what the emergency room did not.

. . . He diagnosed Damon as having a swollen epiglottis and told me that it was sealing over his windpipe, obstructing his breathing and that it would climax within the next 24 hours, at which point Damon would not be able to breathe at all and there existed the possibility of performing a tracheotomy should this happen.

The doctor suggested immediate antibiotics and hospitalization. Damon's mother however, has always sought Western medicine diagnoses and then followed it with alternative approaches to healing.

I attempted to get in touch with my acupuncturist but was unable to and then through a friend I got in touch with David Cleveland, who gave me two remedies, (Arnica and Carbo Vegetabalis [sic]) , to use for Damon if he had more choking seizures during the night. That evening my husband and I, under Dr. Smiths and David Cleveland's careful instructions, kept constant watch over Damon as he slept. His breathing was labored but he slept through until 3 a.m. in the morning when he suddenly awoke, reached out for me and cried "mommy" and fell back against the bed. He was having great difficulty in breathing. I had a moment of great indecision to wake my husband and get Damon into the car and take him to the nearest hospital, less than a ten minute drive away or run to the kitchen for the homeopathic remedies that had been prepared earlier for such an emergency. I decided that the remedies were closest and administered them to Damon's mouth . . . He stirred when the first dose of Arnica was administered, gasped and started to cry. With his gasp and cry his breath returned. Soon his breathing was normal, after repeated doses of the two remedies, he was calm and fell into a deep sleep. His breathing was not as labored as before. This was the last attack Damon had and he has not suffered from this again. Damon has been better since that evening I administered the remedies and he is now five years old, and has had no recurrence.

Keinbach's disease & a university professor. Janet sent this letter in 1990.

Herewith is my account of my Kienbachs's disease episode. In the early spring of 1987 I sprained my wrist (right wrist); it was splinted, but the pain continued with considerable severity throughout the summer and into the autumn. X-rays on several occasions revealed no break, but some evidence of Kienbach's disease: the deprivation of blood to a small wrist bone, resulting in its slow death. Harvard Community Health Plan, (a local Health maintenance organization), referred me to their excellent orthopedic hand and wrist specialist. He confirmed the Kienbach's diagnosis after additional nuclear scans and an M.R.I. scan, Keinbach's can sometimes be controlled through an operation, facilitating the blood flow to the affected bone, but my configuration was not appropriate for such treatment.

Finally, frustration with pain and with the stupefying effects of pain killers, led me to seek advice with David Cleveland who had cured my migraines some years before. After some weeks of remedies from David Cleveland, they scheduled me for another ‘M.R.I' scan (Magnetic resonance imaging, costing about $2,000. per session). I had not informed Dr. Smith of my ‘alternative treatment.

The technicians and Dr. Smith were surprised to find the evidence of Kienbach's -- a shadow indicating a dead or dying bone-- considerably diminished. The pain had diminished to the point of vanishing altogether. Dr. Smith was quite baffled, but cheered; he said my wrist was not "normal" and that we should "keep an eye on it," but that for the time being it seemed fine--which it was. Since then I have had no recurrence of pain. My only caution involves tennis: I wear a small wrist brace to protect the bone against undo shocks. So far, so good: a happy ending (patient letter, 1984).



Fourteen year old's progressive blindness. Craig was fifteen and came from a large family, and when it meant Craig's coming to Cambridge to see me, the entire family arrived to support him. The condition he was suffering from was a form of retinitis. The surgeon had told the boy that he would be blind in both eyes within six weeks and that even surgery would not be helpful and perhaps even dangerous to do. So it was with this ultimatum that I evaluated his case and gave him the first set of remedies. It really wasn't until after the second set of remedies that the results came in and in his surgeon's own words.

"I have never seen this happen before. All of the mucous built up behind the eye, causing the separation, is gone."

One interesting symptom of Craig's case was that he was very apathetic to what was happening in his life. Of interest also, were two other persons that I have seen with retinitis. Both of them displayed apathy as a mind state. Using ‘apathy' as one of the outstanding mind symptoms for these people, I was able to find remedies that fit Craig. Craig still has his eyesight today and is using it now in college (from files, 1987).

The folk singer's tumor. At age 28, she came to see me with a diagnosed tumor on her vocal cords. The doctors wanted to operate on it immediately, at great risk to her singing career of course. She had two visits about a week apart, during which the tumor was shrunk, disappearing totally within some months time.

Gangrenous leg of 23 year old. She told me that she was in Mexico buying and selling drugs, with her boyfriend, when the panel truck they were riding in turned over, pinning her leg under a part of the truck. Her parents paid to have her flown to a Californian Hospital where her leg became infected and became continually worse. When this occurred the parents (local politicians) had her flown to a well known Boston hospital. She laid in their bed for another couple weeks, with no improvement, while continuing to take massive amounts of antibiotic drugs. Her girlfriend (a current patient), after learning that the doctors wanted to amputate her entire left leg, called me and asked if I would help. I responded with "She wasn't a patient of mine." Her girlfriend, however, was forceful enough to convince me. I decided to do what I could, after all the girl was only 23. I saw her twice, each time suggesting different treatments of her infection. Her hospital doctors' saw an immediate change in her blood count, and it became day to day healing after that. She walked out of the hospital, using crutches, three weeks later, with her leg!

Crohns' disease and Mandy. Mandy was suffering from Crohns' Disease and was having continual bleeding and pains in her abdomen. This bleeding stopped within three days of taking the remedies and the pains in the abdominal area left shortly afterwards. She had been suffering from her condition for more than seven years. Later, she confided in me, that the change in her condition occurred much to the amazement of her doctor.

Vanessa suffered from a neurological condition. Vanessa, needed to be in the best of possible health for her many clients. Yet after contracting a virus she was unable to lift her head up anymore. Because of pain and weakness, she had to allow her head to lean heavily toward the right shoulder. In less than a month after taking the remedies there was improvement and after visiting her recently, she was found to have completely recovered from her condition.

. . . We will stop talking about "well-behaved cancers" and "weak viruses" and look at people who are fighting these illnesses. (Siegel 1986 VI.)

Ongoing Research in Homeopathy

If the supposed seeker after truth is not willing to seek truth where it is to be found, namely in experience, then he may leave it undiscovered; he cannot find it in the multiplication tables. (Samuel Hahnemann, 1825 in Haehl 1970, 418)

Because we are quickly approaching the year 2000, the possibility for great paradigm change exists. The next chapter will examine the reluctance to accept paradigm change, as it is occurring in health care. It states that society needs to take those leaps of understanding that will develop a society that has matured enough to take command of this coming age. Homeopathy is shown as part of the paradigm shift that is already occurring.

Each man here below works according to the gifts and strength Providence has given him, and it is only before the fallible tribunal of man that degrees of merit are acknowledged, not so before that of God: God owes me nothing, but I owe him much--yes, everything. (Hahnemanns' dying words to his wife, in Dudgeon 1854 introduction )

   

In Conclusion                                                                         RETURN TO TOP        

The thesis has shown that homeopathy is a tried, non-evasive approach to curing the entire person. How homeopathy is accomplished and the tools that the homeopath uses are discussed at length. Confusion about several points of homeopathy, such as minute doses, are compared and contrasted for understanding. The remedies are shown as being non-toxic because of the minute dilutions.

For background, the life of the founder of homeopathy, Samuel Hahnemann, is brought out to show the turmoil that usually accompanies a society caught up in the need for critical and creative thinking and paradigm change. This background also develops Hahnemann as a key player in to medical paradigm change of his days. Hahnemann is presented as a very educated medical doctor, that chose to quit rather than continue on with the medical treatments of his day. This allowed him the reflective space that he would need to develop his understanding of a new medicine.

The chapter on critical and creative thinking describes what it is and how many experts characterize it. It shows connections between homeopathy and c.c.t. Many followers of homeopathy are acknowledged to discover people that had used their own c.c.t. to search for, and use homepathy for their personal problems.

The thesis intends to demonstrate that the practice of homeopathy uses critical and creative thinking skills, strategies, and techniques to allow the patient to explain their symptoms. In addition, the paper considers what the homeopath does with those symptoms to make his analysis, and finally to make a determination of a correct remedy for the patient.

Many current experts are quoted to support homeopathy as a medicine that can easily stand alone, or work in coöperation with the areas of orthodox medicine that have been successful.

Current research is underway throughout the world proving the actions of Homeopathic remedies. Clinics like the new Homeopathic Hospital in Moscow (1987) have opened. Homeopathic medicine has also been added to the training received at the University of Arizona. In addition, medical schools are once more including lectures in Homeopathic medicine, such as the University of California's School of Medicine, in San Francisco, and the Department of Psychiatry at Duke University, in North Carolina (Ullmann 1988).

Dr. Gerber, mentioned earlier, is a former orthodox doctor, now practicing homeopathy. He shares the following about his friend, also a former orthodox practitioner.

My friend Dr. Greg Manteuffel, told me how his dissatisfaction with conventional medicine led him to explore other forms of treatment and finally apprentice himself to a Homeopath in Chicago. My friend told me he was more successful in treating people since his conversion; he was also much happier, had better rapport with patients, and for the first time in his life, really enjoyed practicing medicine. He felt he was able to stimulate genuine healing in sick people, whereas before he had just suppressed symptoms, often by plying patients with toxic drugs and using methods he now considered more harmful than beneficial. (Gerber 1988, 359)

Finally, in the spirit of paradigm change, the following web address gives many links to homeopathy throughout the world, along with newsletters that can be joined. The internet web site can be found at http:\\www.dungeon.com/home/cam/homeo.html.

It's appropriate to end a work where 'I' was frequently referred to, with a quote by Moore and Franklin, from the author's friend and teacher, John Roger's book.

"It is a mistake for a sculptor or a painter to speak or write very often about his job," said Henry Moore. "It releases tension needed for his work. Keep the tension-the passion--within. Express it in deeds--in actions--not in words." Ben Franklin agreed with this, too: "Proclaim not all thou knowest, all thou owest, all thou hast, nor all thou can'st." [sic] (Rogers 1991, 419)

          









          

HOMEOPATHY &  CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING                  RETURN TO TOP

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Ross, Elizabeth-Kubler. Death- The Final Stages of Growth. N.J: Prentice-Hall, 1975.

Scott, Cyril. Victory Over Cancer Without Radium or Surgery. London: True Health Pub., 1939.

Shadman, Alonzo. Who Is Your Doctor and Why? Boston, MA: House of Edinboro, 1958.

Smith, Ralph Lee. At Your Own Risk. NY: Pocket Books, 1969. Letter insert by Soutter, Lamar. "To Massachusetts Physicians."

Shepard, Dorothy. A Physicians Posy. Hertfordshire, England: Garden City Press, 1969.

Shepard, Paul and Daniel Mckinley. The Subversive Science. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin, 1969.

Solzhenitsyn, Alexander. Cancer Ward. NY: Bantam Books, 1969.  

Siegel, Bernie S. Love, Medicine & Miracles. Cambridge, MA: Harper & Row, 1986.

Storr, Anthony. The Concept Of Cure. NY: Coward. McCann and Geoghegan, 1967.

Sullivan, L. Health United States 1991 and Prevention Profile. MD: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1991.

Tennov, Dorothy and Abelard Schuman. Psychotherapy, The Hazardous Cure. NY:___, 1975.

Thomas, Gordon. Dr. Issels and His Revolutionary Cancer Cure. NY: Peter H. Wyden, Pub., 1973.

______________. A Face-Lift for the Old Club. NY: Time Magazine. Aug. 4, 1980 53.

Toffler, Alvin. Future Shock. NY: Random House, 1970 14.

Townsend. "Townsend Letter for Doctors." ed. Johnathan Collin, M.D., Port Washington, WA: 1988

Ullman, Dana. "An Old Science Emerges", Whole Life Times. Brighton, MA: 1982.

Ullman, Dana. "Sir William Osler and Homeopathy." Homeopathic Research Reports." ed. Dana Ullman, Oakland, CA: Summer, 1989.

W.G.B.H. Television Video. Medicine At The Crossroads. Boston, MA: Jan., 1993.

Wilber, Kenneth. The Holographic Paradigm. Boulder CO: Shambala, 1980.  

Williams, Roger J. Nutrition Against Disease. NY: Bantam Books, 1973.

Williams Sue Rodwell. Nutrition and Diet Therapy. Boston, MA: Times Mirror/Mosby College, 1989.

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© 1997 David Cleveland















 



 

 

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http://www.homeoint.org/site/price/index.htm


html above to excellent first aid to hom site




A Thesis Presented by     

                                                           DAVID CLEVELAND

Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies,

University of Massachusetts Boston, in partial

fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

MASTER OF ARTS    September 1998

Critical and Creative Thinking Program

© 1997 David Cleveland

ISBN 0-938534-10-6

Library of Congress

93-093724



HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINE:

CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING

Approved as to style and content by:

John R. Murray, Assistant Professor

Chairperson of Committee

Henry Mariani, Assistant Professor

James Doyle, D.O. Member

Delores Gallo, Director

Critical and Creative Thinking Program

ABSTRACT

HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINE:

CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING

September 1997

Directed by Professor John R. Murray

This thesis explores the interrelationship between the philosophy and practice of homeopathy and the skills strategies and techniques of critical and creative thinking.

The thesis describes the critical and creative thinking skills that are specifically found in the practice and philosophy of homeopathy. The thesis also gives the reader an understanding of the philosophy and practice of homeopathy. The author takes the reader through one type of homeopathic evaluation process and simultaneously identifies the c.c.t. skills and processes associated with the evaluation. The thesis gives the reader an abbreviated comparison between the medical philosophy of the practice of traditional medical doctors and homeopathic doctors. Furthermore, notes are made of the changes that are taking place in society, toward the acceptance of homeopathy and other alternative forms of treatment of illness.

Acknowledgments

It was Möntaigne who suggested that he "had gathered, a bouquet of other peoples' flowers and only the thread that holds them together was his own." (Oxford 1989, 355, 6)

Other peoples' flowers abound in voice throughout this document. Thanks and great respect go to my gardeners, for helping me be wise in my writing. They weeded out that which was not growing well, and made sure that I was not over fertilizing. Deep thanks for their caring, and sharing of knowledge.





Dr. Henry Mariani     Dr. Patricia Davidson   Dr. John Murray     Dr. James Doyle                        Dr. Delores Gallo  Dr. John Roger Hinkins     Dr. Archie Keigan   Dr. Inez Westerhoek





Thanks to poet W.H. Auden for defining the personal nature of the thesis.

Some thirty inches from my nose

The frontier of my person goes,

And all the untitled air between

Is private pagus and demesne.      

Stranger, unless with bedroom eyes

I beckon you to fraternalize,

Beware of rudely crossing it:

I have no gun but I can spit.





My ‘thank-you' bouquet, goes to the gardeners who planted the original seeds, (sic) my Mother and Father.







T A B L E   O F   C O N T E N T S  

CHAPTER I.    INTRODUCTION  

CHAPTER II.  

CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING

Critical Thinking  

Uncritical Thinking

Critical Thinkers  

A Prerequisite to Critical Thinking  

Critical Thinking Vocabulary  

Richard Paul: Critical Thinkers Needed

Pathways of Creative Thinking.

Einstein's Theory of Guessing

Einstein and creativity.

Humor and Creativity

No Unified Psychological Theory

Creativity is Like the Scientific Method

Stand Under Their Own Stars

Personal Reflections on C.C.T

Critical and Creative Thinking is Caught not Taught.



CHAPTER I I I. HAHNEMANN THE FATHER OF HOMEOPATHY

Overview  

Hahnemann Arrives

Early Support in Sam Hahnemann's Life

Dad's Support

Rousseau's Influence

Schoolmaster's Support.

Dr. Von Quaring

The Governor.

Hahnemann Works on Translating

Paradigm du Jour.

The Doctrine of Phlogiston

Lavoisier's Exact Measurements

Lavoisier loses his head to Robespiere

Hahnemann's Study of Chemistry

Hahnemann's chemical tests

The Cautery

The Seton

Bleeding and Blistering

Hahnemann Steps Away From Orthodox Medicine

Dissatisfaction With Orthodox Medicine.

He Discovers The Theory



 Prominent Homeopathic Supporters

Current Day Testimonials

Dizzy Gillespie

Tina Turner

Yehudi Menuhin

William Tyler

Charles Menninger M.D.

President of A.M.A.

Sir William Osler Supports Homeopathy

Atomic Body

CHAPTER I V    HOMEOPATHY & CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING

Tools of the Homeopath

The Repertory Resource Books.

The Materia Medica Resource Books.

Homeopathy's Rules of Cure

Rule One, Rule Two, Rule Three, Rule Four.

Abstract Rules and Theories

Vital Force and Homeopathy

Homeopathy and Ultimate Indeterminacy

Initial Observations.

Multiple observation perspectives

Listening to the patient

Up front evidence

Carrying the weight of the world

The starting place can be anywhere

Guiding the questions, not asking

Two Different Approaches

Classical Homeopathy.

Drainage Homeopathy.

Homeopathic Dilutions and Small Numbers

Medical Paradigm and Tiny Numbers

Was it Googol or goo-goo?

One million. How big is that?

Accepted numbers, in daily use

Comparing Orthodox Medicine

All Drugs Have Symptoms

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes

Drug Manufacturers

Dangerous drugs and excessive profits

Drugs are a delusion

Personal Change

Homeopathic Case Histories

Carol and her respiratory problems.

Two year old's seizures.

Keinbach's disease & a university professor.

Fourteen year old's progressive blindness

The folk singer's tumor

Gangrenous leg of 23 year old

Crohn's disease and Mandy

Vanessa suffered from a neurological condition

Ongoing Research in Homeopathy 1997

In Conclusion

Bibliography       

.









CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING                                                    RETURN TO TOP



The thesis is organized into four chapters. In the spirit of critical and creative thinking, information is organized to allow the reader to be the judge of the expert's testimonies. Readers ultimately will be the ones making deliberations, or judgments, as new insights into orthodox and homeopathic medicine, critical and creative thinking, and paradigm change, are generated. Chapter I. is the introduction to the thesis. Chapter II. discusses critical and creative thinking. It begins with a brief discussion of critical thinking, then concentrates on creative thinking. Popular interpretations of critical and creative thinking are presented using, past and present, experts' voices. These experts, include Newton, Faraday, Maxwell, Paracelcus, Jenner and of course Einstein. In addition, to these past experts, are the current voices of experts mentioned in Table 2.1. All of these people adopted critical and creative thinking to go beyond the existing paradigms of their days. The chapter continues with a story of critical and creative thinking at work, while commentaries are included to illustrate the widest range of thinking on the subject. The authors' personal reflections on critical and creative thinking bring the chapter to a close.

Chapter III, introduces homeopathic medicine, and commences with an overview of ancient medical history , and theories that demonstrated early health care foundations. Dr. Samuel Hahnemanns' insights into the laws of healing, are shown as the catalysts for his creation of homeopathic medicine. Included in the chapter is the history of Hahnemanns' childhood, family life, education, and personal struggles with the medical practices of the time. His dissatisfaction with these medical practices is described as leading to his recognition of homeopathy as a new medical paradigm. Hahnemanns’ pioneering work in the fledgling field of chemistry is mentioned, as the author believes it also contributed to a medical paradigm in the late 1700s.

Chapter IV ., Evaluation Framework for homeopathy, examines a homeopathic strategy for completing a patient evaluation. Exploring 23 years of personal experience, demonstration consists of what is required to accomplish a homeopathic patient evaluation, and how it utilizes critical and creative thinking. This chapter includes definitions of the homeopathic reference books that are most commonly used, and how the authors' personal techniques vary from traditional homeopathy.

The infinitesimals portion of this chapter discusses the most misunderstood realm of homeopathic medicine. "Infinitesimals" describes the minute dilutions conducted on the ingredients that compose the homeopathic remedies. The effectiveness of these dilutions is discussed, along with many cited examples. The opposite of Infintismals are the complex drugs that orthodox medicine dispenses. These drugs are briefly discussed to give an accurate viewpoint of what orthodox drugs are, and how homeopathic medicine

compares with them. The following question is also addressed, "Why should I consider homeopathy when there are so many, apparently successful, orthodox drugs available?"

Next, is a listing of some noteworthy homeopathic followers and their statements regarding homeopathy. This chapter includes the author's personal homeopathic research and accomplishments over the past twenty years as a homeopathic practitioner. Current research in the field of homeopathy closes the chapter.

Paradigm and paradigm change is defined in a 1974 dictionary , as a "model or a pattern", or "a systematic inflection of a verb or noun showing a complete conjugation or declension." (Woolf, H.B. 1974) The 1987 dictionary, American Encyclopedic Dictionary , defines paradigm as, ". ..an example or pattern, especially of inflection of a noun, verb. . .” Paradigm and paradigm change affect many beliefs, both ancient and modern.

Definitions from people considered experts in their fields, and challengers of paradigm, are included for illumination and comparison. Paradigm and paradigm. change are included in this thesis, along with critical and creative thinking, as multifaceted threads that will expose and integrate consideration of homeopathic medicine. The paradigm of economics is contrasted in Appendix B.

RETURN TO TOP

 CHAPTER I I.                             

Critical and creative thinking (c.c.t.) is included in this thesis as a tool, used by homeopathic practitioners.

Critical Thinking

'Critical,' as used in critical thinking, refers to a neutral, expansionist way of thinking. It uses multiple perspectives, identifications of assumptions, logic, and "what if" questions. It infers thinking that is beyond the obvious. Albert Shanker, quoted in Omni magazine said the following about critical thinking. "Life requires critical thinking skills, the ability to express yourself, persuade, argue and build, that's what we need to teach students" (Cummings 1990, 44).

Uncritical Thinking

It may be useful to review Richard Paul's definition of a non-critical thinker, before continuing. "A non-critical thinker is a person who hasn't developed intellectual abilities. This allows uncritical people to be naive, conforming, manipulable, dogmatic in their thinking, and easily confused. In addition, they can be close minded, narrow minded, poor with word choices, and unable to identify evidence from an interpretation. The uncritical person may feel that they are being critical in their thinking which makes our topic a fundamental human problem. Teaching for insight can approach the problem by illuminating the general tendency to be an uncritical thinker" (Paul 1993).

Critical Thinkers

Paul feels that critical thinkers will conceptualize the whole and will be involved in overcoming psychological and intellectual barriers that they may be accepting, and comfortable with at present. He subsequently, states that critical thinking is incorporated into a lifestyle, not just studied for a semester or two. One of the most important traits that critical and creative thinkers possess, according to Paul, is that of suspending judgement and being open-minded. (Paul 1993)

A Prerequisite to Critical Thinking.

"Critical thinking starts from perceiving your place in society . . . but critical thinking goes beyond your perceptions, toward the actions and decisions people make to shape and gain control over their life" (Costa 1991, 188).

Critical Thinking Vocabulary

Costa's definition of critical thinking states that we must use ample evidence, statistical information, facts, examples and expert witnesses from primary and secondary sources. Primary evidence, as provided by personal observation, has the greatest impact. Secondary evidence, leads a person to ask questions, and some of these questions could be as follows.

Is the source considered an expert on the subject? •Is the source in the references cited, or a bibliography of other works? •Is primary material (first hand) used as evidence? •Is the source's use of language objective? •Is the source recently dated? •Is the source found in a reliable publication? (Costa 1991, 305)

The reader can see from the above critical thinking questions that "critical" is not about the words in the following list:

Derogatory, Disparaging, Faultfinding, Picky, Judgmental, Belittle, Contempt, Negative, Uncomplimentary, Deprecate, Ridicule, Contrary, Disapproving, Dissenting, Opposing, Fatalistic, Pessimistic, Skeptical, Dubious. (Davis 1986, 54)

A critical thinker would most likely be using "critical" in the sense of:

Crucial, Decisive, Important, Momentous, Pivotal, Analytical, Discriminating, Preference, Selective, Significant, Meaningful. (Davis 1986, 44)

A critical and creative thinker would probably accept that there are as many thinkers, and viewpoints, as there are people on the planet.

Costa helps to identify critical and creative thinkers by explaining:

Just as basic reading differs from advanced reading, basic thinking abilities also differ from critical thinking abilities. (Costa 1991, 3)

Richard Paul: Critical Thinkers Needed.

Richard Paul explains how important the need for critical thinkers is and the difficulties surrounding this task.

The necessary paradigm shifts, however, do entail the cultivation of critical thinking across the work force, up and down the lines of labor and management, across industries, across educational levels, and into the everyday discussions of national and international issues. This shift is painfully against the American grain, contrary to our orthodox folk wisdom, and incompatible with much current thinking of both business and labor leaders (Paul 1993, 11).

Pathways Of Creative Thinking

This section, on creative thinking, begins with a short story from an (unknown) architect. He had finished building a cluster of office buildings in the middle of a large area that he had sown with grass. He then waited to put the sidewalks into place until people had etched into the lawn, the natural pathways. When the pathways were well- defined, he constructed the appropriate sidewalks for the buildings (Oech 1983, 144).

The following statements are further ‘pathways' of creative definitions, taken from a large sampling of authors. These creative thinking definitions generally include the ‘individual', which in turn includes the scientist, the homeopath, and orthodox medical people, as they work in their individual disciplines. Table (2.1) presents some views of ‘creativity' by people in the fields of education, science, psychology, and critical and creative thinking.

Many of skills and strategies of c.c.t. describe a similar pattern of evaluation that a homeopath uses in determining a client's imbalance. For example, a homeopath must remain open to comments and symptoms and continually search for alternative explanations. No two clients are considered the same, nor is it expected that they will describe their concerns in similar ways. The homeopath must be able to hear a symptom and frequently rephrase it in order to elicit deeper, causal symptoms. Failure occurs in homeopathy, but there always remains an opportunity to turn that failure into further research of the patient's symptoms. As a homeopath, the author particularly cherishes the use of humor during the evaluation work-up. The author's thoughts are that if the person can understand their problems with appropriate humor (without judgement, or criticism), that they may shed some light onto their condition, allowing them to be more objective as to their condition. Often times humor will allow symptoms that have been suppressed to resurface. In addition, humor and laughter challenges the healing abilities of the body into action.

Table 2.1 Viewpoints On Creative Thinkers & Thinking.

                    Author                               Interpretation                                        Source

Jerome BrunerAn act that produces effective surprise--this I shall take as the hallmark of a creative enterprise BrunerBruner 1962, 3C.Cornett. . . Thrive on incongruity. . .have a whimsical frame of mind.Costa 1991, 103Joseph Costa. . .Exposing students to the flavor and texture of creative inquiry and hope they get hooked.Costa 1991, 87Gary DavisThe creative person and self-actualized person are the same.Davis 1986, 29Sigmond FreudCreativity is merely the outcome of an unconscious neurotic conflict.Davis 1991, 22Carl JungThe ‘psychological type' is consciously involved in creativity. The ‘visionary type' is creative and mystical.Davis 1986, 15Roger von OechHumor forces you to combine ideas that are usually not associated with each other.Oech 1983, 92Sidney ParnesHumor and creativity depend on seeing something in the more obvious way.Parnes 1981, 35Richard PaulCreativity is essential to all rational dialogical thinking. . .Baron 1987, 143David Perkins . . . They learn to view failure as normal, even interesting and challenging.Costa 1991, 194David RenzulliGifted children are high in creativity, and motivation, and are at least average in intelligence.Davis 1991, 158(Burrhus Frederic)

aka  B.F.SkinnerSince we have no freedom and our behavior is controlled by others we should not accept the dignity of personal achievement. Davis 1991, 25 

Einstein's Theory of Guessing.

A recent scientist who creatively guessed, when nothing he was doing was providing solutions to a problem, was Albert Einstein. In his theory of gravitation he went ahead and guessed, beyond the already known principles. (Feynman 1991, 162)

Einstein and creativity. A creative person is always questioning and examining where he or she is in the universe. According to Feynman, Einstein had the following to say about creativity.

To raise new questions, new problems, to regard old problems from a new angle requires creative imagination and makes real advances. The formation of a problem is often more essential than its solution, which may be merely a matter of mathematical or experimental skills. (Einstein in Feynman 1991, 170)

Humor and Creativity.

Cornett (1986) felt that, "creative problem solvers thrive on finding incongruity and have a whimsical frame of mind" (Costa, 1991, 103). It's known that laughter transcends all human beings and that it affects the body's physiological functions. This can include a drop in the pulse rate, a secretion of endorphin and an increase of oxygen in the blood. It's also known to liberate creativity and provoke such higher level thinking skills as anticipation, finding novel relationships, and visual imagery. "People who behave intelligently can perceive situations from an original and often humorous vantage point. They need to initiate humor more often . . ." (Costa 1991, 103). "Both humor and creativity depend largely on our being able to see something in more than the obvious, expected way" (Parnes 1981, 35).

Davis surmises that creative people would most likely share some of the following traits:

They are aware of their creativity; independent, self-confident, enthusiastic, spontaneous, adventurous, thorough, curious, have wide interests, good sense of humor, playful, childlike, artistic interests, aesthetic interest, idealistic, reflective, needs for privacy, and are attracted to novelty, complexity, and the mysterious. (Davis 1986, 31)

Experts in the fields of psychology and science have the ensuing thoughts about creative thinking.

No Unified Psychological Theory. .

We freely use such terms as imagination, ingenuity, innovation, intuition, invention, discovery and originality, interchangeably with ‘creativity.' (Freeman, Butcher and Cristie 1986 in Davis 1991, 14)

Davis (1991) continues with a quotation from Nichols (1972).

. . . the term creativity is used with something approaching (reckless) abandon by psychologists. . . and people in general. Davis 1991, 14)

Creativity is Like the Scientific Method..                                                                      

Torrence (1977) thinks that creativity is like the scientific method:

That the creative person will be able to sense gaps in information or problems, they will then form ideas and hypothesis, they test and modify these hypotheses and finally communicate the results. (Torrence in Costa 1991, 16)

B.F. Skinner proposes that even if there is creativity it would not exist because we really didn't create it. Skinner, associated with his theory of behaviorism, studies a person's visible behavior, instead of the many gestalt activities that may be occurring simultaneously.

. . . since we have no freedom, and all of our behavior is controlled by those who give us reinforcements and punishments, that we should not accept the dignity which comes from personal achievements, as these were really determined by the people who handed out the rewards and the punishments. (Skinner in Davis 1986, 25)

With all the definitions and thoughts that endure in the domains of science, medicine, and education, it is suggested that we consciously search for and accept paradigm change that is occurring today, and to support those that are working for these changes. Buckminster Fuller felt strongly about societies' need to mentally relocate into a new paradigm consciousness

We are going to have to spread our wings of intellect and fly or perish; that is, we must dare immediately to fly by the generalized principles governing the universe and not by the ground rules of yesterday's superstitious and erroneously conditioned reflexes. And as we attempt competent thinking we immediately begin to reemploy our innate drive for comprehensive understanding. (Fuller 1971, 52)

Stand Under Their Own Stars.

Marilyn Ferguson ,quotes Herman Hesse when he said, "Every life stands beneath its own star." She continues with, The transformed self has new tools, gifts, sensibilities. Like an artist, it spies pattern; it finds meaning and its own inescapable originality. Like a good scientist the transformed self experiments, speculates, invents and relishes the unexpected (Ferguson 1980, 85).

Personal Reflections on C.C.T.

On reflection, there are as many definitions of critical and creative thinking as there are people who have consciously expressed themselves. The author adds to these definitions with his personal understanding of critical and creative thinking. "c.c.t. is an unfolding process, a process of discovery, and of self awareness. Awareness in the sense that there is a choice, while typing, to continue typing this line, or to skip a line, even though it would not be appropriate. There is a choice of making these words italics or bold, or even assigning numbers (1. , 2. , 3.) to them, where they don't belong, according to current paradigms of writing. An important part of being a critical and creative thinker incorporates enhanced awareness and intrinsic freedom. It includes the ability to step outside of governing rules or structures of society. The use of c.c.t. must also acknowledge, and use, the responsibility and integrity of personal thoughts, actions, and responsibility."

Critical and Creative Thinking is Caught not Taught.

The following is an addendum to the previous definition that said, "critical and creative thinking cannot be taught" (Costa1991, 87). This author's suggestion is, "It is caught, caught in the sense of knowing. A persons' knowing they are capable of more, and actually taking the actions necessary to become more."

When the mind is thinking, it is talking to itself. (Plato in Costa 1991, 102)









 CH A P T E R  I I I                                  RETURN TO TOP

Overview

What homeopathic medicine is, the theories it was built upon, how it was discovered, how it works, along with a biography of Hahnemann, are topics of this chapter. Information is presented with the spirit of the pendulum of paradigm change, which is again swinging back toward the general acceptance of homeopathic medicine. Homeopathy is an alternative to much that is not working in the accepted, traditional, medicine of today. This chapter aspires to establish that the very laws of cures, associated with homeopathy, are connected to more profound universal laws. The evidence for this comes from various writers' statements and interpretations, gathered from present and past centuries. Discussion originates during ancient days, and proceeds to current times, showing similarities of ancient thinkers, to creativity and paradigm change. For comparison traditional medical treatments are included to show the methods that Hahnemann had to work with, and part of the reason he would become disillusioned with his own, traditional medical understandings. A homeopathic foundation that has withstood much debate and criticism is discovered next. The following quotation asks a question similar to one Homeopaths have asked of traditional paradigm understandings for many centuries, and continue to ask today.

Macro sphere. Why will you refuse to listen to reason? I had hoped to find you-as being a man of sense and an accomplished mathematician-a fit apostle for the gospel of the three Dimensions, which I am allowed to preach once only in a thousand years: But now I know not how to convince you. Stay, I have it. Deeds, and not words, shall proclaim the truth. Listen, my friend. (Abbott 1952, 77)




Dr Samuel Hahnemann M.D. - Arrives

No thesis that includes homeopathy would be complete without addressing aspects of the life of its founder. This history is included in order to give the reader a reflective view of the events that contributed to the founding of homeopathy.

Early Support In Sam Hahnemanns Life.

He was born Samuel Christian Frederich Hahnemann, on April 10, 1755, at Meissen, Germany. His father decided early to give his son "lessons in Thinking," drawing heavily on his own readings of Rousseau. At five years old his father started to give thinking lessons to his young son, with the admonition to "prove all things" and to "hold fast to that which is good." Because of his fathers early teachings in thinking, Hahnemann was advanced in his education at the age of twelve. Advanced enough for an appointment by his schoolmaster, to tutor his younger schoolmates in the Greek language.

Dad's Support.

Hahnemanns father wanted that his son obtain an education, however, he had conflict over needing his son around the house to help with the many chores. It must have been with great disparity that he frequently took him out of school for assistance at home. However, it was to late as Samuel had already obtained a burning desire for an education (Haehl 1971). Later in his life, he thanks his father for his early guidance during his childhood.

My father died four years ago, without being deeply versed in science. He was a painter for the porcelain factory of the town, the author of the brief treatise on water- colour painting. He had found for himself the soundest conceptions of that which was good and can be called worthy of man. These ideas he implanted in me, "to act and live without pretence and show," was his most noteworthy precept, which impressed me more by his example than by his words. He was frequently present, though unobserved, where something good was about to be accomplished. Should I not follow Him? (Haehl 1971 10)

Rousseau's Influence.

Hahnemann often mentions that his father had read to him from Jean Jacques Rousseau, and from these frequent readings his father imparted much of the philosophy of Rousseau. He may have even read the following passage of Rousseau's writings to his son.

Integrity of the heart, when fortified by reason, produces an accurate mind. A good man almost always thinks accurately; and with a little experience, one who has been accustomed from infancy not to confuse himself when he reflects, nor to yield himself to present pleasure, until he has weighed the consequences and balanced the advantages, has nearly all the requirements for forming the judgement. It seems, indeed, that good sense depends more on the sentiments of the heart than on the clearness of the mind . . . (Boyd 1962, 31)

Schoolmaster's Support.

Recognizing Hahnemann's talent was not being employed fully, Hahnemann's schoolmaster, approached Hahnemann senior. He suggested that the younger Hahnemann be allowed to finish his schooling uninterrupted, while personally offering to pay for the son's school expenses. The father relented and allowed Samuel to return to school. Later, at the age of twenty years, Samuel would receive $20. , and his father's blessings. This included permission to leave home, and journey to Leipzig, Germany to attend college. In Leipzig, he would busy himself attending lectures during the day, and translating English texts into German at night. To earn additional money, he tutored German and French to a fellow student (Haehl 1971).

Dr. Von Quaring.

During Hahnemann's stay in Leipzig he made the acquaintance, and later friendship, of Dr. Von Quaring. The doctor was known for his successful practice in medicine, and for the celebrity status of his patients, patients such as the Emperor Joseph. Dr. Quaring treated Hahnemann as his own son, and not only allowed him to visit patients with him, but actually acquired for Hahnemann, the position of physician and Librarian to the Governor of Siedenburgen, Germany.

The Governor.

Hahnemann worked for the Governor for two years, cataloging his vast collection of books and coins. He would spend his nights reading and studying the collection of books, which became his work during the day. At twenty-four he was ready to continue his studies at the University of Erlangen, Germany. On his resume he was able to state that he had tutored himself in Latin, English, Hebrew, Italian, Syraic, Arabic, Spanish, and some Chaldaic. He had also improved on his familiar Greek and German (Haehl 1970).

Hahnemann Works On Translating.

In 1784, Hahnemann translated DeMachy's work, The Art of Manufacturing Chemical Products. Hahnemann not only translated but improved upon the writing and made many suggestions for change. He became quite sought after for his editing expertise. This work increased his knowledge and lead to more of a complete understanding and referencing of material.

Some examples of Hahnemann's editing expertise are attested to when Demachy writes, "I know little of the work of carbonification of turf." Hahnemann, while editing DeMachy's work, added six different examples of this "turf" in his notes to the author. Where Demachy spoke of a rare Italian book, Hahnemann not only cited the book, but related further details from it. Demachy wrote of a French writer, without giving his name. Hahnemann not only added the name of the Frenchman but, the work that Demachy was trying to relate too (Haehl 1971).

Paradigm du Jour

           The Doctrine Of Phlogiston.

Prior to the discussion of Doctor Hahnemanns' departing traditional medicine, and the development of homeopathy, it is appropriate for the reader to understand the existing doctrines that influenced the medicine he worked with, and some of the treatments that were currently in use during the 1700s.

Until Lavoisier's discoveries, (late 1770s), the teachings of John Joachim Becher (1635-1683) and those of G.E. Stahl (1660-1734), were the accepted paradigms. Lavoisier's teachings were slowly replacing alchemy and Phlogiston. The doctrine of Phlogiston was known as the "Inflammable Principle." According to this principle nothing in the world was capable of burning without this principle being at work.

An example of paradigm and paradigm change considers that in the 1990s, a chemist might ask the question, "Of what known elements is this or that substance composed of "? Whereas, in the 1700s the question may have sounded more like, "What unknown something lies hidden in a substance?"

Societies struggle to understand the paradigm of Phlogisticated air was taking place when Samuel Hahnemann and Lavoisier were doing research in chemistry, in 1744. Lavoisier showed that water does not change to earth, as the current paradigm taught, but that it was composed of Hydrogen and Oxygen. That same year he explained that the increase in weight that takes place when metals are oxyadised, [sic] occurs because of incorporation of air (Ameke 1875).

Lavoisiers' Exact Measurements.

In the years 1774, 1780 and in 1783, Lavoisier published his experiments, with an exactness that was previously unknown. He proved that the increase of weight that takes place when Phosphorous and Sulphur are burnt, is equal to the loss of the weight of the air in which the burning takes place. He concluded, that the ingredient of air, which was transferred to the burnt substance, was the constituent common to all acids, therefore he called it "Oxygen" (known as Sauerstoff, in German). This changed forever, the paradigm of the 1700s (Haehl 1970, 407).

Lavoisier loses his head to Robespiere. In the year 1794, to raise much needed research money, Lavoisier accepted the government post of Farmer-General. During this employment he was challenged to account for some deed. It was because of Robespiere's displeasure with the results of Lavoisier's work, that he was guillotined on May 8, 1794. Fortunately, Lavoisier's work became accepted, and by the year 1799 his ideas were the new paradigm and were commonly in use, as some continue to be today (Ameke 1875).

Hahnemann's Study Of Chemistry.

After graduation from the University of Erlangen, Hahnemann moved to Dessau, Germany (1781) and turned his attention to the study of chemistry. He would later receive an appointment to practice medicine in the town of Gommern, Germany.

Hahnemann's chemical tests. Hahnemann was not only busy doing translations and making others' works more refined, but was experimenting and developing his own tests for muriatic acid and sulfuric acid. He called attention to the use of too much magnesia in the brine of salt works, and introduced a method of separation. Hahnemann created careful experiments on the subject of crystallization, the solubility of salts at different temperatures, and the possibility of separating them by means of crystallization. He also investigated many useful ideas for the detection of impurities in chemicals. All of this work prepared him for his later insights and the founding of homeopathy.

Professor Henke, writing in the Homeopathic Journal, Archiv Für Medic. Erfahrüngen, wrote, "Hahnemann's new test for the presence of Arsenic in the body . . . The classical work of Dr. Hahnemann, on Arsenic, by means of which the best modes of analyzing Arsenic were introduced into medical jurisprudence" (Haehl 1971, 622).

Hahnemann is also credited with the introduction of dilute acids into chemical use, and the determination of their specific gravities, these tests closely approach the methods of modern day labs.

In 1795, in the Journal der Pharmacie, Hahnemann explained what he called his Wine Test. This test was used to decide the presence of lead in wine, used as a sweetener by the wine-makers. Today, due to paradigm changes, scientists know that lead can be responsible for cramps, colic, brain dysfunction and death (Haehl 1971).

During Hahnemann's life, (1755-1843) the traditional medicine, was based on assumption that "humours" caused illness. The paradigm of that time stated that "every means available should accomplish humour removal." The following list illustrates methods that were commonly used for humour [sic] removal.

The Cautery.

This procedure consisted of a white hot iron rod, or some chemical agent that would burn. Doctors employed it to dig deep into the body, and then they inserted dried peas into the incision. They finally sealed this with an application of compressive bandages, and continued to add a fresh supply of dried peas daily.

The Seton.

In this procedure the doctor pinched up, the flesh of the patient, and made an incision. A skein of cotton or silk was inserted, then on later checking of the wound, part of the skein was drawn out. The saturated part was cut off, to await more saturation and another doctors visit. Setons were usually applied to the back of the head to draw out foul humours. Additionally, they applied the Seton to the region of the heart to "clean and polish it up." The doctors used the Seton on other parts of the body as they felt it was needed.

Bleeding and Blistering.

These procedures were commonplace. In addition, doctors would apply Arsenic, to coat the wounds that resulted. As a result, many thousands of patients would die of Arsenic poisoning. Bloodletting was among the favorites of treatments and has been revived today, for current use in removing dead tissue and gangrenous areas (Haehl 1971).

Hahnemann Steps Away From Orthodox Medicine

The above practices set the stage for Hahnemann to search for alternatives in  medicine, that eliminated the above practices, and replaced them with homeopathic medicine, which gave a scientific approach to the of medicine of the era. During Hahnemanns' stay in Gommern, he became dissatisfied with the medicine that he was  practicing, because of all its side-effects and poisonings. In fact, he began to question the very fundamentals of medicine as it was known. The outcome was that he suspended his practice of medicine and continued to make a living by translating medical texts. In his spare time he verified, and tested, his theories about medicine using healthy human beings. Eventually he named his new theory homeopathy, creating a new medical paradigm of the day.



Dissatisfaction With Orthodox Medicine.

Homeopathy was developed in the late 1700s, by Dr. Samuel Hahnemann, M.D. of Germany. He received his M.D. at Erlangen, Germany, but because of his dissatisfaction and searching, he would unknowingly build upon previously mentioned, century old paradigms of medicine. Medicine needed an investigator, like Hahnemann, to put the pieces together, form a discipline, and therefore foster paradigm change.

He Discovers The Theory.

Hahnemann, was translating Cullen's Materia Medica, a compilation of many medicines, and the results of Cullen's testing them. He found himself disagreeing with the author's premise as he relates . . . .

I made the first pure experiment with Chinchona Bark upon myself, and thereby discovered its power of exciting the familiar symptoms of intermittent fever. With this first trial, it broke upon me the dawn, that has since brightened into the most brilliant day of medical art, that it is only by their power to make the healthy human beings ill, that the medicines can cure morbid states; and even so, only such morbid states whose symptoms the selected drug itself can produce in the healthy. (Haehl, 1971 328)

Subsequently, Hahnemann moved to the town of Dresden, Germany and published numerous books on chemistry, and created many new forms of chemical testing, as mentioned earlier (Haehl 1971).

Prominent Homeopathic Supporters    



Hahnemann was a hard worker and was 89 when he died. As shown in Appendices A., he wrote 116 large works and approximately 120 pamphlets. According to Hahnemann himself, "He was always filling gaps in his education."

If like attracts like, as homeopathy believes, than what do the following notables have in common in the ways that they filled their own gaps of education?

The Duke of Glouster; Edward the VIII; Elizabeth Palmer Peabody; Elizabeth Stuart Phelps; Emanuel Swedenborgian; George the VI; Harriet Beecher Stowe; Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; Horace Greeley; Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe; John D. Rockefeller Sr.; Julia Ward Howe; Louisa May Alcott; Mahatma Gandi; Mark Twain and Mary Baker Eddy (Haehl 1970, 28). Nathaniel Hawthorn; President McKinley; Princess Mary Adelaide; Queen Adelaide; Queen Elizabeth of England, and The Royal Family; Theodore Parker; Thomas Starr King; Thomas Wentworth Higginson; Thomas Bailey Aldrich; Wendell Philips; William Cullen Bryant; William Seward; William Lloyd Garrison; William James; Yehudi Menuhin; Dizzie Gillespie; Mother Teresa and Tina Turner. (Ullman 1988, 2)

The answer is, they are, or were, all proponents and users of homeopathic medicine.

Not everyone is a proponent of Homeopathy, as you will discover if you visit the following link. These two men are MDs, supposed educated men. And yet, they put down  Homeopathy, which has over 1 million web sites on the Internet, many of them run by MDs. They have not taken the time to discover. To discover a medicine that is still chosen by the Royal Family in England, and used by countless millions throughout the world. To discover a safe and inexpensive form of treatment.

Click here, to return to the quackbusters area,

In Orthodox Medicine Reconsidered







 Current Day Testimonials

In more recent periods the following people attest to their encounters with homeopathy.

Dizzy Gillespie.

There have been two revelations in my life-- the first was bebop and the second, homeopathy (Gillespie in Ullman 1988, 2).

Tina Turner.

Life in the fast lane wore me down, changes in my diet and homeopathy saved me. Thanks to my Homeopathic physician, For bringing me back to health and always being available for me (Turner in Ullman 1988, 3).

Yehudi Menuhin.

Homeopathy is the safest and more reliable approach to ailments and has withstood the assaults of established medical practice for over one hundred years (Menuhin in Ullman 1988, 3)

William Tyler. Chairperson of Materials and Science Engineering Dept. at Sanford University, California. . .

It is clear that we are going out of the age of chemical and mechanical medicine into the age of energetic and Homeopathic medicine. (Tyler in Ullman 1988, 3)

Charles Menninger M.D. According to Dr. Menninger, Founder of the Menninger Clinic.

Homeopathy is wholly capable of satisfying the therapeutic demands of this age better than any other system of medicine. (Menninger in Ullman 1982, 12)

President of A.M.A.

Malcolm Todd, a former President of the A.M.A., while speaking, as President, at an A.M.A. conference in San Diego, California, endorsed alternative medicine. Later, in Houston, Texas, when speaking to an extremely traditional medical audience he said,

Orthodox medicine needs to take an aggressive role in the integration of holistic approaches into mainstream medicine, as they promise an exciting rejuvenation of Western medicine. That this interaction might include biofeedback and the psychology of consciousness to paranormal phenomena, physic healing etc. . .(Todd in Ferguson, 1980)

Sir William Osler Supports Homeopathy.

From the Journal Of the American Medical Association (J.A.M.A., 258, July 3, 1987), Sir William Osler is quoted from his farewell address to the American medical profession, Osler said:

It is not as if our Homeopathic brothers are asleep; far from it, they are awake . . . The original grievous mistake was ours . . .to quarrel with our brothers about Infintismals was a most unwise and stupid thing to do. (Osler in Ullman 1987, 3)

Atomic Body

What have these people been supporting? Ferguson and Gerber give further insight into homeopathy. Marilyn Ferguson explaining that the body is very sensitive and works on a very minute atomic level.

Belatedly, half a century after we should have taken the hint from physics, Western medicine is beginning to recognize that the body is a process a bioelectric whirlpool, sensitive to positive ions, cosmic rays, trace minerals in our diet, free electricity from power generators. (Ferguson 1980, 256)

Dr. Richard Gerber seconds the thoughts of Ferguson when he contributes the following:

The discoveries of pathways that bind the brain and the immune system rescues the behavioral approach to disease (homeopathy) from the shadowy practices of the witch doctors and places it squarely within the rational tradition of western medicine. We are witnessing the birth of a new integrative science, psychoneurimmunology, which begins with the premise that neither the brain nor the immune system can be excluded from any scheme that proposes to account for the onset and course of human disease. (Gerber 1988, 480

                                             © 1997 David Cleveland


C H A P T E R I V

Homeopaths work with manifested body symptoms that characterize good health, or the lack of it. The homeopath depends on being able to interpret a set of symptoms that are available when a person is in a state of disease, or imbalance. These manifested symptoms are used as guidelines, to discover remedies (medicines) that a patient's system needs, to return it to a state of balance (health). After taking a detailed history of the patient's past and current symptoms, the homeopath will consult repertories and materia medicas (portrayed next) to finish the patient's consultation. Such an evaluation will take from one to three hours to complete.



Following is an analysis of the patient evaluation, along with the tools and techniques  personally changed and added to this evaluation, creating an evaluation that additionally considers ‘drainage' of the mental and physical toxins of the body. This ‘drainage' is accomplished before giving the most indicated remedy to the patient.

Tools of the Homeopath

The Repertory Resource Books.

Kents' Repertory, contains a very precise listing on 1,531 pages of mental and physical symptoms. The Repertory starts with a 100-page listing of mind symptoms alone. Included in these mind symptoms are anxieties, fears, delusions, apprehensions, dreams, and more. The book continues to list symptoms for other parts of the body, starting with head symptoms, and proceeding down the body to foot symptoms. The book provides a listing, besides each listed symptom, of the most common homeopathic remedies for that particular symptom.

The homeopath then continues to examine other symptoms given them by the patient, while keeping track of the remedies that are beginning to emerge. At the end of the list of symptoms the homeopath will have a sizable list of corresponding remedies. At this point they will choose the most indicated 10-20 remedies, open a Materia Medica and research each of the indicated remedies. This will reduce the possibilities even further

        The Materia Medica Resource Books.

Just as there are many repertories there are also many authors of materia medicas, W. Boericke, M.D. has written a very popular one. These Materia Medicas contain a comprehensive listing of the remedies actions on various parts and systems of the body. A process of elimination will occur as the homeopath reads about each of the indicated remedies, and determines which of these remedies has the most symptoms of the patient in question. This process allows the homeopath to discover the best possible choice of remedies for the patient. The homeopath is assured, on reading these descriptions, with the knowledge that each remedy has been tested on thousands of healthy volunteers, and have been described in the words of these volunteer provers.

Homeopathy's Rules Of Cure.

The rules of homeopathy, and its theories, have been working for more than 180 years. These human organism rules were first noticed by Dr. Constantine Hering (1800- 1880). Hering is known for establishing Hannemans' homeopathic medicine in the United States. After much research and observation, Hering formulated the following rules, to guide the homeopath in his healing.

Rule One.

Healing takes place from the top of the body and proceeds downward. This means that a person's headache, mental state etc., will improve before any improvement will occur in lower parts of the body.

Rule Two.

The body will heal the most important organ first and continue to heal in the direction of the least important organ..

Rule Three.

Healing occurs in the inner areas of the body first and than healing will move outward to external parts of the body. This means that skin symptoms will be the last to heal.

Rule Four.

Symptoms will disappear in reverse order. A person's problem today, will be healed first, and then any suppressed problems from the past will come back to be healed, in order of their suppression.

With these homeopathic rules as a guideline, the homeopath does not acknowledge a difference between mental and physical illness. Instead they see one, as having traits of the other. In treating a person, both are considered. (Coulter 1972)

Abstract Rules and Theories.

For comparison, it is noted that a traditional patient's ‘symptom descriptions' are taken from them and entered into a different semantic system. Into a set of abstract rules and theories that are fed back to them in a way that they are not meant to understand. Ill persons have their sickness taken from them, depriving the patient of words to discuss their problem. This leaves them with the latest scientific measurements, and the doctors understanding of what these measurements could mean. These become the guidelines to healing and recommendations are, to take this or that drug, in order for your sick body to come back within the normal range of scientific measurements. The patient follows the doctor's findings-to be better . . . little is ever spoken about cure.









Dr. Wallace Esterbrook, a former surgeon and now a practicing psychiatrist shares: WE DOCTORS HAVE A PREDILECTION FOR NOUNS IN NAMING DISEASES--EPILEPSY, MEASLES, BRAIN TUMOR . . . , AND BECAUSE THESE THINGS "DESERVE" NOUNS AS NAMES, THEN OBVIOUSLY THEY ARE THINGS TO US. IF YOU TAKE ONE OF THESE NOUNS- MEASLES, AND MAKE IT INTO A VERB, THEN IT BECOMES, "MRS. JONES, YOUR LITTLE BOY APPEARS TO BE MEASLING." WHICH OPENS BOTH YOUR MIND AND HERS TO THE CONCEPT OF DISEASE AS A PROCESS. (ESTERBROOK ON W.G.B.H TELEVISION 1993)

We doctors have a predilection for nouns in naming diseases--epilepsy, measles, brain tumor . . . , and because these things "deserve" nouns as names, then obviously they are things to us. If you take one of these nouns- measles, and make it into a verb, then it becomes, "Mrs. Jones, your little boy appears to be measling." Which opens both your mind and hers to the concept of disease as a process. (Esterbrook on W.G.B.H Television 1993)

Vital Force and Homeopathy

The term ‘vital force,' used earlier, does not refer to, or subscribe to, any ancient, mystical procedures. Vital force relates to the homeopaths' respect for an unknown healing force. The humility of nature and its' workings is always a reminder to the homeopath, not to make an attempt to ‘know it all,' and too allow individual disease patterns to vary from person to person.

Homeopathy and Ultimate Indeterminacy

In stressing the ultimate lack of knowledge of the body's functioning, physiologically and mentally, homeopathy tends to show agreement with Jungian analytical psychology and with theoretical physics. These disciplines both accept the ultimate indeterminacy of the phenomena investigated, and call for a symbolic "as If" approach to their understanding. (Coulter 1972, 10)

The following observations are made with the author's background of   having studied and worked with Naturopathic medicine; studies and philosophies of   Arica Institute; Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness; participation in several Insight Training programs; training in Zen tradition; study of macrobiotic disciplines; study of Iridology; and the experience of having worked with more than six thousand clients.

Once the client arrives, an immediate observation consists of . . . Their posture   Their movement Quality of their voice   Their physical appearance   Brightness of their eyes and if any spots are showing in the pupil   The feeling of their hand (moist, oily, dry, calloused)   Personal opinions . . do they appear to be suppressing anger or sadness?  Subtle sensations, "as if" (as if, bugs were crawling . . . )

       All of the above are considered in the analysis and overall treatment of a client.

Multiple observation perspectives. By observing a client's particular postures and movements the homeopathic observer may be able to determine if they are carrying burdening psychological baggage. Posture may also reveal the client's level of confidence in themselves. From these observations it can be determined what is needed to start the actual evaluation (workup). The patient may be offered something to eat or drink. Then the conversation to begin the search for symptomology can commence. Determining the comfort level of the person in new surroundings is important, along with paying attention to how they explain themselves. Observation continues as the homeopath watches the patient sitting in their chair, and interprets their body language.

Listening to the patient. By listening to the person describe themselves and their symptoms, the homeopath obtains information that will be researched in the materia medicas and repertories. The homeopath is concerned about the many varied traits that make up the whole person and will directly and indirectly elicit answers as to their confidence, sadness, anger, etc. . . . When appropriate, they ask a question, to delve deeper into the understanding of a concern, or symptom, and its causal history. A recent example is that of a man that was being evaluated. He was diagnosed (by traditional medicine) as having leukemia with only a short period of life left. All during the homeopathic evaluation he was cracking jokes and making light of his problem. This led to a quantum leap question of, "had he ever been suicidal in his life?" Whereupon, he answered "yes." His answer helped to discover suppressed events and grief that caused, or supported his problem. A more obvious type of (symptom) is the whining type of voice. This person may be asked, "Do you feel you have everything that you need in your life, and if not, what's missing, what do you need?"

Up Front Evidence. On shaking hands with a client detecting a sense of comfort with a new situation is possible. It can also show their assurance or ambivalence with their being, by the pressure of their grip. Through the feeling of their hand determination can be made as to the condition of their heart and their kidneys (using macrobiotic observational techniques). For example, the hand will be moist if they are overworking the kidneys, and the hand will feel fat or bloated, if they overwork the heart. Often this is just a temporary condition but, it is something to be taken into consideration for use in a total workup.

Carrying the weight of the world. If the person is carrying abundant physical baggage, such as books, shopping-bag's etc., it may be a key to that the persons not feeling they have enough, or are personally not good enough. As a result they have to carry their baggage around as a support mechanism. This might lead to researching remedies that include a mental feeling of ‘lack'.

The starting place can be anywhere. The actual work up will start at a place that will most likely be different for each client. It may start by asking them to write out their information on the front of an exam book. Or It might start by talking immediately about their reason for the visit. Above all, it is made clear initially that there is nothing they can say that will be judged as unimportant, ridiculous or stupid.

Guiding the questions, not asking. During the work-up a homeopath will purposefully not ask many direct questions. Instead the homeopath will ask questions that guide the patient in their answers. This is established to obtain information that uses a patient's own words. Their own words are very important, because the information contained in the materia medicas and the repertory books, are words of healthy people (not symptoms obtained by traditional medicine's ill patients, guinea pigs, rabbits, monkeys . . . ). These healthy people are used as provers to test homeopathic medicines and have answered in their own words what they experienced after taking a particular homeopathic remedy. A person proving a remedy, states to the master prover, (In charge of collecting symptoms), that they are feeling depressed, very talkative, and want to be constantly busy. In addition, they suffer from a sore throat (on the left side only), and experience the inability to wear shirts with tight collars, along with other symptoms. The homeopath will use these symptoms to prescribe the appropriate, similar remedy. From reading the homeopathic materia medicas and repertory books, the substance described above (by its symptoms) is most likely the medicine (remedy) ‘Lachesis'. The homeopath will be guided with the knowledge that the particular substance being proven, taken in a crude dose, or repeated frequently, can cause the above complaints. The homeopath also knows that if a diluted form of Lachesis is taken, (a homeopathic dose) balance will return to the patients' body. Therefore, the law of, ‘like cures like.'

If the homeopathic patient states the same symptoms as listed above, the homeopath will add this remedy ‘Lachesis' to the list of possible remedies that are being considered for this person, now. ‘Now,' is underscored anticipating the same person returning years later and having new, or different, symptoms.

The chart that follows lists several critical and creative thinking concepts and compares these ideas with how the author, as a homeopathic practitioner, uses them for a patient work-up, evaluation.

Table 4.2 Personal Evaluation Techniques                  

Personal Empowerment: Costa pg 100

The homeopathic evaluation allows the patient insight into their disease/ imbalance. The depth and variety of questioning allow this to occur during the interview. The evaluation is used as a foundation for the person to approach treating themselves for future medical events.

Open to Being Wrong: Einstein pg 103

A Homeopath has to constantly reevaluate a patients symptoms, and only use past problems as history. They view each new patient or complaint as a new entity. The Homeopath treats a failure in finding the correct remedy as an adventure and challenge.

Suspend Judgement Paul pg 99

Homeopathic goals are not to give a patient a medical diagnosis, a disease label. Most Homeopaths will conduct their work-up/evaluation using a quite room, pleasant music, soft lighting, perhaps light snacks, along with a casual manner of dress, to convey the relaxed, nonjudgmental process.

Thrive on Incongruity Cornett pg 103

Homeopaths do not force the patients symptoms to fit a predetermined disease category/name. They listen carefully and find the many incongruities of the patients disease and use these as supporting evidence for the discovery of the correct medicines. For example, if the patient needs the medication, Arsenicum Album, than they would have a hot head and the rest of their body would be chilly or cold. They may crave water or be totally thirst-less. They would also be experiencing fear.

Conceptualize the Whole Paul pg 99

Homeopaths need to understand the entire person and all of the patients symptoms will have importance. During the evaluation the patient's nutritional habits are considered, along with their mind state (fears, anxieties, worries, beliefs . . . ) along with their physical pains and discomforts.

Collaboration Reich pg 99

The Homeopath uses all available sources in their search for complaints and patient symptoms. A collaborative environment prevails when a patient describes his/her problems/symptoms, during which they are treated with respect and equality. Homeopaths are also open to using orthodox medical tests and advice from orthodox medical doctors when they feel that this collaboration will be helpful to the patient.

Two Different Approaches

Classical Homeopathy.

Most orthodox homeopaths will give a remedy that has the majority of outstanding characteristics of the patients symptoms and they will let that remedy work until they need another dose. They know this approach as Classical Homeopathy. However, it does create discharges and sometimes is even blocked from working because of the lack of drainage remedies.

Drainage Homeopathy.

Another approach is to give remedies that will specifically antidote the following from the system before giving the above classical remedy.

Aluminum: to antidote aluminum in the system

X-ray: to antidote the bad effects of excessive X-ray's to the organism.

Thuja: to antidote the residual effects of   immunization shots.

Natrum Muriaticum: to antidote deep suppressed grief.

Nux Vomica: to antidote the bad effects of previous poisonings (alcohol, food, drugs . )

After the administration of the drainage remedies, the remedies that are indicated for the deeper complaints of the patient will be given.

During the client's evaluation the homeopath does not have to ask questions in exact order, but will be guided not to forget questioning in each category. The homeopath will also keep in mind the rules of healing, listed at the start of this chapter, when doing the work-up. Not listed, but to be considered during the work-up (evaluation), are the many shades of generalities that will accompany a symptom. For instance mind symptoms are considered the most important symptoms and if a client complained about anxiety the homeopath would want to determine the following generalities.

At what time of day?                                                     

Where in the body is anxiety located?

What ameliorates the anxiety? (Heat, walking, not thinking about it. . . .)

What makes the anxiety worse?

When was the first occurrence?

Does the weather play a part? If so, what type of weather?

Are there accompanying physical symptoms?

Table 4.3 Evaluation Framework

MIND A-Z (Abandoned-Zest). What mind symptoms are observable, what can be elicited by self or others, including records?

HEAD, Inner, outer Location of pain/sensations; do these extend to distant areas. Inflammations?

 EYES, vision Heaviness; discharges; distortions; eruptions; inflammation; pain; photophobia; staring; spasms etc., vision blurred; colors; distortions; etc.?

NOSE, smell, breathing Discharge; bleeding; obstruction; smell- acute, lost. Pain; sensitivity; sneezing?

EARS, hearing Discharges; pulling or boring fingers into; eruptions; sensitivity; ulceration; illusions; impairment?  

MOUTH, taste tongue, teeth, gums Taste; putrid, sour, acrid, alkaline, aromatic, astringent, bitter, chalky, cheesy, clammy, earthy, pasty, like eggs, like food long eaten, rancid, sweet, salty, sawdust, slimy, smoky, sour, sooty, soapy, straw-like, sulphur etc.

Tongue; cracking, shape, discoloration, coating; bleeding etc.. Teeth; decay, distortion, pain, elongation, grinding, sensitive. Gums; bleeding, sensitive, pain etc.?

FACE & LIPS Eruptions; pain; distortion; bloating; cracked lips etc. ?

THROAT swallowing Inflammation; location, type of pain, sticking, sharp, shooting, extends to...; craving cold or hot drinks, or applications?

CHEST Respiration Heaviness; pains; growth; palpitation; exaggerated , breathing; tension; numbness etc.?

ABDOMEN, upper and lower Cramping; bloating; coldness; heat; pain; etc.?

STOMACH, digestion Cramping; regurgitation; swelling; appetite; cravings and aversions; gurgling; indigestion; nausea etc.?

BACK, upper, lower Pains; distortion; posture; injuries; cracking; cramps; growths; weaknesses etc.?

EXTREMITIES, movement. Arms & legs-upper, lower. Knees and elbows. Pains; injuries; awkwardness; coldness or heat; constrictions; convulsions; cracking; cramps; discoloration; distortion; splitting of nails; emaciation; heaviness etc.?

GENITALIA, sex, elimination. Eruptions; discharges; pains; misplacement. Desire, excessive or lost. Various pains.

RECTUM, elimination. stool. Pains; eruptions; constipation; diarrhoea; urging; prolapse; swelling; flatus; inactivity; involuntary; stool shape and coating (mucus, blood) and color etc.?

TEMPERATURE, fever, chill Time of day; location; better by heat/ cold; restlessness; hallucinations; fear; apprehensions; paroxysms

SKIN ,perspiration, dryness Eruptions; dryness/oiliness; location; itching; blotches; elevations; ulcers etc.?

GENERALITIES, times, aggravations and ameliorations Despite the clients symptoms it's important to know if their problem is worse, or better by-heat, cold, pressure, light, sound, crowds, eating, and many other outside influences.

Sensations ‘As If.' Although a sensation is not the most important symptom, often it will be a helpful key to understanding the entire image that will arise from studying the symptoms as a complete picture. For instance a client may state that their anxiety creates a sensation ‘as if' they would have to jump off a bridge. Or that, the anxiety is ‘as if' they were being put into a vise and squeezed. Homeopaths' have books written on sensations ‘As If' where they can research even these small details.

Times of occurrence. Several books have been written that set the times of the persons malady. A person would mention that they wake up at 2 A.M. and can not get back to sleep until 1. They have eaten, 2. They have gone to the bathroom, 3. They meditate etc.. They may mention that their pains start at a certain time and then go away quickly at yet another time.

Homeopathic Dilutions and Small Numbers Information on ‘minuteness' is investigated, as the attenuations, or dilutions, of homeopathic remedies are the enigmatic component of homeopathy, and the most frequently misunderstood area of homeopathic medicine. It's the author's perception that the common lack of understanding of the minuteness of homeopathic substances may come from the belief that for a medicine to work, it must be observable under a microscope in its' original state. Further, its' measurements must be within the realm of the current paradigm of measurements, that it must be available for chemical testing, and at the very least, be able to make a patient somewhat infirm, before they are well again.

Fortunately, many researchers are performing work with the homeopathic micro- dilutions today, and are able to prove the existence and effectiveness of the homeopathic dilutions. Dilutions that have been a mystery over the past centuries, are now gaining credibility, owing to paradigm change and newer and more sophisticated machinery. It's of significance that the remedies have been successful over many centuries, despite researchers and practitioners abilities to actually observe the medicines chemistry.

Infintismals and the results of their use, have supported homeopathy for the past 180 years of homeopathic success.

Medical Paradigm And Tiny Numbers.                           

Fortunately, paradigm change has occurred in medicine, and mathematics. The following is an attempt to illustrate recent approaches of observing large and small numbers. After reading the following, it will be easier to apply the expert's thoughts and examples to the minute dilutions.

Was It Googol, or goo-goo? The reader is now introduced to a ‘Googol.' The young nephew of the American mathematician Edward Kosner invented the term googol. This occurred when Kosner asked, his nephew, to make up a name for a very large number. So today the Googol (perhaps Goo-goo in the original) is the number one followed by 100 zero's.

It looks like this. . . 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,

000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. (Davis 1961).

One million. How big is that? Let's start with another, more common, large number. What does one million (1,000,000) mean to most people? Winning the Lottery? More than a thousand?Here are a few examples. If someone gives you a dollar bill every two seconds, how long will it take for you to have one million dollars?

The answer: 24 days, 24 hours a day.

A calendar one million years old, would read approximately Eighth Century B.C..

Driving one million inches, a person will have traveled 16 miles.

Accepted numbers, in daily use. The following professionals use other magical, hard to conceptualize, numbers in their daily work. For instance, the scientist estimates  that the brain contains 10 to the 10th (1010) cells or neurons, and is far more complex than any computer. If this number, 1010 is further represented by dots that are 1/8th of an inch apart, the dotted line would extend half way around the earth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keep going. . . . . . .

Further examples, include the chemical Thyroxin, which is produced naturally by the thyroid gland. Used in research it can strongly influence the growth of tadpoles. This occurs when one drop of Thyroxin is added to five million drops of medium. Acetyl chlorides, cause a drop in blood pressure when present in proportion of one milligram to 500,000 gallons of blood. Histamine, provokes reactions in guinea pigs, in a dilution that is not detectable by micro-chemical analysis. Lysergic acid diethylamide (l.s.d.), in a quantity weighing only 1/200,000 of an ounce, is enough to create reactive hallucinations in the human mind (Illich 1976).

Researcher, H. Junker, added various substances, attenuated to 10-27) , to bacterial cultures, and found the growth of bacteria was affected. In addition, J. Paterson, when determining the Schick Test, to test for Diphtheria, discovered that the test results changed from positive to negative. This was accomplished by oral administration of Alum- precipitated toxoid in a dilution of 10-60. Using the homeopathic remedy Diphtherininum, in a dilution of 10-402 a reaction developed in yet another test (Illich 1976).

Even with these already excepted, large and minuscule numbers, many people still have a problem in their understanding minuscule numbers with which the homeopath works. Homeopathic remedies originate with dilutions of 10-30. ,which corresponds with, .000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,001. Homeopathic dilutions have been extended as high as 10  to the -100,000M.

Comparing Orthodox Medicine

Orthodox medicine comes close to homeopathy in their making chemicals for immunization shots. However, that's as close as they get. For instance in one year alone, 1978, the F.D.A. stated that one and one half million people, about the entire population of Boston, Massachusetts, needed hospitalization. Hospitalization because of drugs they had taken, on a doctor's prescription, to cure their complaints. Thirty percent of these people were further damaged by the therapy that they were given for the original mistakes (Townsend, 1992).

All Drugs Have Symptoms.

All traditional drugs contain the possibilities of serious symptoms. These symptoms may not occur until a year or two after the drug has been taken. This often leads the doctor, and the patient, to believe that they are still ill. From this they are given  even more drugs. This drugging leads to the death of an estimated 300,000 people a year (Sullivan 1991). This figure is three times the population of Cambridge, Massachusetts, dying every year.

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes.

If a doctor gave a placebo to one hundred of his patients, ninety of them would get better. (Holmes in Illich 1976, 142)

Drug Manufacturers.

There are approximately 2500 drugs that are currently available to the traditional physician. They are manufactured by 250 drug firms in the United States alone. These drugs are catalogued in the Physicians' Desk Reference'. Each of the manufacturing firms has an average of ten branches throughout the world. As can be imagined large amounts of time and money are being invested, and like any business, they must show a profit. As an example, to promote Valium, its' manufacturer (Hoffman and LaRouche) spent more than $200 million dollars on advertising. In addition, they commissioned two hundred medical doctors to write glowing testimonials, and scientific articles [sic], praising their drug (Illich, 1976 66).

Forbes magazines', Annual Report of American Industry, showed that in 1984, the drug industry's median net profit was 10.6%, three times that of other reported industries (Calafano 1986). This same report, in January of 1993, states the median net profit was at 22.4% (Forbes Jan. 4. 1993).

Dangerous drugs and excessive profits. Speaking of expensive drugs, Former Secretary Of U.S. Health Education and Welfare, Dr. Joseph A. Calafano cites the drug Centoxin. The drug is used to treat infections that a patient acquires as a result of a stay in a hospital. Its known to cause fatal toxic shock, and is sold for $3,800 per dose. Again, it's given to treat an infection that was accidentally acquired because of unsanitary conditions in their hospital. (Calafano 1986).

The drug companies cannot make a profit if the American public is not buying. However, the news is that they are buying, as never before. They are purchasing and thereby creating the following statistics. Seventy seven billion prescription pills, five billion of which are tranquilizers, are being sold in the 1990's. This makes the U.S. the most drug dependent nation in the world (Sullivan, 1991).

These are not encouraging figures if people are going to wake up, become critical and creative in their thinking, recognize paradigm and the need for paradigm change, and start taking responsibility. With the above consumption figures the ‘paradigm change message', won't even be heard, in a society drugged out of awareness.

There are some remedies worse than the disease. (Publilius Syrus , 42 B.C. Oxford 1980, 402)

Drugs are a delusion. George Bernard Shaw in the Doctors Dilemma, (1913), states, "Nature has provided . . . in the phagocytes . . . a natural means of . . . destroying  all disease germs. There is, at the bottom, only one genuine scientific treatment for all disease and that is nature" (Shaw in Townsend 1992, 52).

Dr. Arnold Mandell, a San Diego, California, psychiatrist states:

The use of drugs to treat everything from anxiety to insomnia, to schizophrenia itself has to be judged a failure. Few patients, if any, are cured. the most violent manifestations of mental illness can be controlled, but with what long term consequences, no one knows.

Dr. Mandell continues with,

One of the common drugs used for schizophrenia, actually makes the disorder worse, and that Tricyclic antidepressants, increase the rate of mood cycling, leading to long- term increases in the numbers of relapsing episodes. (Mandall in Gleick 1987, 298)

Personal Change        

The author was already quite involved in the research and study of herbs and their medicinal uses, and was slowly being drawn to the study of Naturopathy. Naturopathy is specific training in the nutrition, hygiene, and treatment of the patient with diet, colonics, body massage, vitamin supplements and homeopathy. As the name implies, natural care for the body.

The author's thinking was, "Within the universe and in all that exists in it, including all the named diseases, there must be some very simple answers to these diseases and they must be available to the honest searcher." From my understandings and readings of herbs and plants I recalled the following example. The plant known as Rhus Toxidendron, (Poison Ivy), grows quite successfully in many places. These are places where the unwary gardeners are, or where children are at play. This is where they may discover the effects of this shiny leafed renegade. The itching, soreness, welts on the skin and tendency to spread easily are well known and hard to forget. Less known, is the fact that in nature a plant called Jewel Weed, and another plant called Burdock, grow in close proximity to the poison ivy plant. Both plants will cure the familiar symptoms of ivy poisoning, by making an herbal tincture out of them and applying it to the affected skin. Armed with this simple awareness, I started my search for safe medicines, available from nature.



The author discovered homeopathy first and later, as a Naturopath, specialized in Homeopathy. Twenty years have elapsed, and more than six thousand clients have been interviewed and treated by the author. Out of that number, no one has become ill from taking homeopathic medicines. Most patients recovered from their complaints within a short period, usually less than three months. This is demonstrated by a handful of case histories that are dispensed. Many of the people in these case histories had been diagnosed and treated by traditional medicine, before attempting the homeopathic approach. The names have all been changed for confidentiality.

Homeopathic Case Histories.

Carol and her respiratory problems. Carol was 25 when she first had chest infections that invariably turned into pneumonia or bronchitis. She complained of being constantly on antibiotics, and of being well for only ten days out of the month. She was in a vicious cycle of taking antibiotics. She kept complaining to her doctors but they repeatedly told her that most of her problems were caused by her mental state. The doctors had her hospitalized as a psychotic, because of her many complaints and her general depression.

Her mother refused to accept the fact that Carol (then a child) was sick, and so Carol reacted, by suppressing her complaints from her family, until she started passing out during forced shopping trips. The patient stated in her letter to me. . .

In fact often as a teenager, I was in so much pain that I went to bed completely convinced that I would not wake up in the morning, I felt so sick-- I got as far as writing letters of goodbye but never told anyone of feeling bad . . . In the space of an hour I can go from being jovial and full of life too suicidal, and it still happens often. Today as an adult these infections still ruin my life. I cannot hold a job. I cannot go to school . . . It may seem amazing and irresponsible that I have hardly gone to doctors for the last ten years for this, but I have found them unable to hear me, and generally send me back to psychiatrists. (Patients' letter, 1970)

The author agreed to work with her, and did a three and ½ hour evaluation, suggested some months worth of individualized remedies, and asked her to return in four weeks. She didn't return however. A short note arrived in the mail about three months later, and read:

I wanted to write and tell you of the miracle you have worked on my health . . . About once a month I have a faint recurrence of infection, and I take a 1/4 teaspoon of remedy and no more illness. The bronchitis is completely under control! My life is very, very different not to be on antibiotics all the time, and I am supremely happy and forever grateful. Thank you very much!

Two year old's seizures. Carla wrote me with her sons health report. Her letter told of an acute problem she'd had with her 2-year-old son.

When my son, Damon was about two years old he suddenly started having choking seizures which lasted several minutes and then he would be fine. One was so violent that I took him to the emergency ward of a hospital, thinking something was stuck in his throat. They advised me to have him checked by his pediatrician as there was nothing lodged in his throat.

She took him to the pediatrician she had used since Damon was born. This doctor found what the emergency room did not.

. . . He diagnosed Damon as having a swollen epiglottis and told me that it was sealing over his windpipe, obstructing his breathing and that it would climax within the next 24 hours, at which point Damon would not be able to breathe at all and there existed the possibility of performing a tracheotomy should this happen.

The doctor suggested immediate antibiotics and hospitalization. Damon's mother however, has always sought Western medicine diagnoses and then followed it with alternative approaches to healing.

I attempted to get in touch with my acupuncturist but was unable to and then through a friend I got in touch with David Cleveland, who gave me two remedies, (Arnica and Carbo Vegetabalis [sic]) , to use for Damon if he had more choking seizures during the night. That evening my husband and I, under Dr. Smiths and David Cleveland's careful instructions, kept constant watch over Damon as he slept. His breathing was labored but he slept through until 3 a.m. in the morning when he suddenly awoke, reached out for me and cried "mommy" and fell back against the bed. He was having great difficulty in breathing. I had a moment of great indecision to wake my husband and get Damon into the car and take him to the nearest hospital, less than a ten minute drive away or run to the kitchen for the homeopathic remedies that had been prepared earlier for such an emergency. I decided that the remedies were closest and administered them to Damon's mouth . . . He stirred when the first dose of Arnica was administered, gasped and started to cry. With his gasp and cry his breath returned. Soon his breathing was normal, after repeated doses of the two remedies, he was calm and fell into a deep sleep. His breathing was not as labored as before. This was the last attack Damon had and he has not suffered from this again. Damon has been better since that evening I administered the remedies and he is now five years old, and has had no recurrence.

Keinbach's disease & a university professor. Janet sent this letter in 1990.

Herewith is my account of my Kienbachs's disease episode. In the early spring of 1987 I sprained my wrist (right wrist); it was splinted, but the pain continued with considerable severity throughout the summer and into the autumn. X-rays on several occasions revealed no break, but some evidence of Kienbach's disease: the deprivation of blood to a small wrist bone, resulting in its slow death. Harvard Community Health Plan, (a local Health maintenance organization), referred me to their excellent orthopedic hand and wrist specialist. He confirmed the Kienbach's diagnosis after additional nuclear scans and an M.R.I. scan, Keinbach's can sometimes be controlled through an operation, facilitating the blood flow to the affected bone, but my configuration was not appropriate for such treatment.

Finally, frustration with pain and with the stupefying effects of pain killers, led me to seek advice with David Cleveland who had cured my migraines some years before. After some weeks of remedies from David Cleveland, they scheduled me for another ‘M.R.I' scan (Magnetic resonance imaging, costing about $2,000. per session). I had not informed Dr. Smith of my ‘alternative treatment.

The technicians and Dr. Smith were surprised to find the evidence of Kienbach's -- a shadow indicating a dead or dying bone-- considerably diminished. The pain had diminished to the point of vanishing altogether. Dr. Smith was quite baffled, but cheered; he said my wrist was not "normal" and that we should "keep an eye on it," but that for the time being it seemed fine--which it was. Since then I have had no recurrence of pain. My only caution involves tennis: I wear a small wrist brace to protect the bone against undo shocks. So far, so good: a happy ending (patient letter, 1984).



Fourteen year old's progressive blindness. Craig was fifteen and came from a large family, and when it meant Craig's coming to Cambridge to see me, the entire family arrived to support him. The condition he was suffering from was a form of retinitis. The surgeon had told the boy that he would be blind in both eyes within six weeks and that even surgery would not be helpful and perhaps even dangerous to do. So it was with this ultimatum that I evaluated his case and gave him the first set of remedies. It really wasn't until after the second set of remedies that the results came in and in his surgeon's own words.

"I have never seen this happen before. All of the mucous built up behind the eye, causing the separation, is gone."

One interesting symptom of Craig's case was that he was very apathetic to what was happening in his life. Of interest also, were two other persons that I have seen with retinitis. Both of them displayed apathy as a mind state. Using ‘apathy' as one of the outstanding mind symptoms for these people, I was able to find remedies that fit Craig. Craig still has his eyesight today and is using it now in college (from files, 1987).

The folk singer's tumor. At age 28, she came to see me with a diagnosed tumor on her vocal cords. The doctors wanted to operate on it immediately, at great risk to her singing career of course. She had two visits about a week apart, during which the tumor was shrunk, disappearing totally within some months time.

Gangrenous leg of 23 year old. She told me that she was in Mexico buying and selling drugs, with her boyfriend, when the panel truck they were riding in turned over, pinning her leg under a part of the truck. Her parents paid to have her flown to a Californian Hospital where her leg became infected and became continually worse. When this occurred the parents (local politicians) had her flown to a well known Boston hospital. She laid in their bed for another couple weeks, with no improvement, while continuing to take massive amounts of antibiotic drugs. Her girlfriend (a current patient), after learning that the doctors wanted to amputate her entire left leg, called me and asked if I would help. I responded with "She wasn't a patient of mine." Her girlfriend, however, was forceful enough to convince me. I decided to do what I could, after all the girl was only 23. I saw her twice, each time suggesting different treatments of her infection. Her hospital doctors' saw an immediate change in her blood count, and it became day to day healing after that. She walked out of the hospital, using crutches, three weeks later, with her leg!

Crohns' disease and Mandy. Mandy was suffering from Crohns' Disease and was having continual bleeding and pains in her abdomen. This bleeding stopped within three days of taking the remedies and the pains in the abdominal area left shortly afterwards. She had been suffering from her condition for more than seven years. Later, she confided in me, that the change in her condition occurred much to the amazement of her doctor.

Vanessa suffered from a neurological condition. Vanessa, needed to be in the best of possible health for her many clients. Yet after contracting a virus she was unable to lift her head up anymore. Because of pain and weakness, she had to allow her head to lean heavily toward the right shoulder. In less than a month after taking the remedies there was improvement and after visiting her recently, she was found to have completely recovered from her condition.

. . . We will stop talking about "well-behaved cancers" and "weak viruses" and look at people who are fighting these illnesses. (Siegel 1986 VI.)

Ongoing Research in Homeopathy

If the supposed seeker after truth is not willing to seek truth where it is to be found, namely in experience, then he may leave it undiscovered; he cannot find it in the multiplication tables. (Samuel Hahnemann, 1825 in Haehl 1970, 418)

Because we are quickly approaching the year 2000, the possibility for great paradigm change exists. The next chapter will examine the reluctance to accept paradigm change, as it is occurring in health care. It states that society needs to take those leaps of understanding that will develop a society that has matured enough to take command of this coming age. Homeopathy is shown as part of the paradigm shift that is already occurring.

Each man here below works according to the gifts and strength Providence has given him, and it is only before the fallible tribunal of man that degrees of merit are acknowledged, not so before that of God: God owes me nothing, but I owe him much--yes, everything. (Hahnemanns' dying words to his wife, in Dudgeon 1854 introduction )

   

In Conclusion                                                                               

The thesis has shown that homeopathy is a tried, non-evasive approach to curing the entire person. How homeopathy is accomplished and the tools that the homeopath uses are discussed at length. Confusion about several points of homeopathy, such as minute doses, are compared and contrasted for understanding. The remedies are shown as being non-toxic because of the minute dilutions.

For background, the life of the founder of homeopathy, Samuel Hahnemann, is brought out to show the turmoil that usually accompanies a society caught up in the need for critical and creative thinking and paradigm change. This background also develops Hahnemann as a key player in to medical paradigm change of his days. Hahnemann is presented as a very educated medical doctor, that chose to quit rather than continue on with the medical treatments of his day. This allowed him the reflective space that he would need to develop his understanding of a new medicine.

The chapter on critical and creative thinking describes what it is and how many experts characterize it. It shows connections between homeopathy and c.c.t. Many followers of homeopathy are acknowledged to discover people that had used their own c.c.t. to search for, and use homepathy for their personal problems.

The thesis intends to demonstrate that the practice of homeopathy uses critical and creative thinking skills, strategies, and techniques to allow the patient to explain their symptoms. In addition, the paper considers what the homeopath does with those symptoms to make his analysis, and finally to make a determination of a correct remedy for the patient.

Many current experts are quoted to support homeopathy as a medicine that can easily stand alone, or work in coöperation with the areas of orthodox medicine that have been successful.

Current research is underway throughout the world proving the actions of Homeopathic remedies. Clinics like the new Homeopathic Hospital in Moscow (1987) have opened. Homeopathic medicine has also been added to the training received at the University of Arizona. In addition, medical schools are once more including lectures in Homeopathic medicine, such as the University of California's School of Medicine, in San Francisco, and the Department of Psychiatry at Duke University, in North Carolina (Ullmann 1988).

Dr. Gerber, mentioned earlier, is a former orthodox doctor, now practicing homeopathy. He shares the following about his friend, also a former orthodox practitioner.

My friend Dr. Greg Manteuffel, told me how his dissatisfaction with conventional medicine led him to explore other forms of treatment and finally apprentice himself to a Homeopath in Chicago. My friend told me he was more successful in treating people since his conversion; he was also much happier, had better rapport with patients, and for the first time in his life, really enjoyed practicing medicine. He felt he was able to stimulate genuine healing in sick people, whereas before he had just suppressed symptoms, often by plying patients with toxic drugs and using methods he now considered more harmful than beneficial. (Gerber 1988, 359)

Finally, in the spirit of paradigm change, the following web address gives many links to homeopathy throughout the world, along with newsletters that can be joined. The internet web site can be found at http:\\www.dungeon.com/home/cam/homeo.html.

It's appropriate to end a work where 'I' was frequently referred to, with a quote by Moore and Franklin, from the author's friend and teacher, John Roger's book.

"It is a mistake for a sculptor or a painter to speak or write very often about his job," said Henry Moore. "It releases tension needed for his work. Keep the tension-the passion--within. Express it in deeds--in actions--not in words." Ben Franklin agreed with this, too: "Proclaim not all thou knowest, all thou owest, all thou hast, nor all thou can'st." [sic] (Rogers 1991, 419)

          









          

HOMEOPATHY &  CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING                  RETURN TO TOP

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